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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology.
Note: Nesting Behavior
Cornell University. Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County. Horticulture Diagnostic Laboratory.
See also: Tree and Shrub Disease for more fact sheets.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.
Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service. Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences.

Virginia Tech. Department of Entomology.

Alabama Cooperative Extension System.

Cornell University Cooperative Extension. Department of Natural Resources.
See also: ForestConnect Fact Sheet Series for more factsheets.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Boxwood blight (also called "box blight" in Europe), caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum (=C. buxicola), was found for the first time in the United States in North Carolina, Virginia and Connecticut in 2011. The first reported infestation in the U.S. was in a North Carolina nursery and the disease was introduced to Virginia on plants from that nursery. Spread outside the two Virginia locations, both of which are fields owned by a single nursery, has not been reported. However, growers should be aware of the symptoms of boxwood blight and monitor nursery and landscape boxwoods for symptoms.

Texas A&M University. Texas Forest Service.

See also: Texas Forestry Association's "Dirty Dozen" (scroll to view) for more fact sheets

Texas A&M University. AgriLife Extension Service.

See also: Citrus Publications for more resources