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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

Alabama Cooperative Extension System.

Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Georgia Department of Agriculture.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has analyzed the potential environmental effects of establishing an integrated management strategy to control cogongrass in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina. The draft environmental assessment is now available for comment. Cogongrass is an invasive exotic grass found on public and private property, along roadways, in forests, and on farmland. This federally regulated noxious weed grows rapidly, reducing forest productivity, harming wildlife habitat and ecosystems, and encroaching on pastures and hayfields. Because of cogongrass' impact on agriculture and forest industries, Congress has given APHIS funding to partner with Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina to control the spread of this weed. APHIS is proposing is an integrated management strategy that uses preventive, cultural, mechanical, biological, and chemical methods to control cogongrass in key areas of its distribution. APHIS invites the public to review and comment on this environmental assessment by April 1, 2020.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Today, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and Clemson University’s Department of Plant Industry (DPI) announced their plans for combatting the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) in Charleston County, South Carolina. In June, APHIS and DPI confirmed the beetle is infesting trees in the county. The eradication strategy in South Carolina will be like those used for other ALB infestations in the United States. It includes establishing a quarantine, removing infested trees, and potentially using, with the landowner’s permission, a combination of tree removal and chemical treatment for trees that are within a half-mile radius of an infested tree.

If you live in the regulated area (PDF | 576 KB), please help by allowing officials access to your property to inspect and remove trees. If you live in Charleston County or nearby counties, please look for ALB and examine your trees for any damage that may be caused by the beetle, such as dime-sized exit holes in tree trunks and branches. Please take pictures and, if possible, capture suspicious insects in a durable container and freeze them, which helps to preserve the insect for identification. ALB is not harmful to people or pets. Report the insect or tree damage by calling the ALB hotline at 1-866-702-9938 or online at www.AsianLonghornedBeetle.com.

USDA. FS. Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit.
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.
Montana State University.
The Center for Invasive Species Management closed in 2015. Archives of relevant materials are available here.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.
Provides information to both growers and home gardeners, in two distinct sub-sites -- to get the basics on the insect and the disease it can vector, how to inspect your trees, how to treat your tree if you find ACP, critical things to do to help contain the insect population and deal with Huanglongbing (HLB), as well as additional information more specific to California.
Clemson University Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.

Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

To minimize the spread of invasive species, interested stakeholders have met to develop voluntary Best Management Practices for Invasive Species. These guidelines will help Wisconsin residents and visitors to limit the likelihood of moving invasive species around.