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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Secretariat of the Pacific Community.

Recently, the health of coconut palms has come under severe threat. The Pacific Community (SPC), working with Pacific Island countries and territories, and development partners, is looking for ways to meet this threat before it devastates the hopes of economic progress in the region. In August of 2017 an alert was issued identifying a new danger to the Pacific, which is causing devastation to coconut palms and expanding rapidly across the region. The new threat comes from a longstanding adversary in the region: the rhinoceros beetle.

Business Queensland (Australia).

Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Australia). 
Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Australia). 
Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Australia). 
Alberta Sustainable Resource Development (Canada). Fish and Wildlife.
See also: Wildlife Diseases in Alberta for more fact sheets
British Columbia Ministry of Environment (Canada).
See also: Amphibians in B.C. for more resources
Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme. Pacific Invasives Learning Network.
This resource is to assist Pacific island invasive species practitioners in their battle against invasive species. It includes the Pacific Invasive Species Battler Series on common Pacific topical issues and an option to see what new resources have been added lately. You can also search for documents, case-studies, reports and other media by selecting the appropriate "Guidelines" theme or objective, or use the general search function by selecting tags related to the resources.
Otago Regional Council (New Zealand).
Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Centre of Expertise for Aquatic Risk Assessment.
Fisheries and Oceans Canada. Central and Arctic Region.
Canadian Manuscript Report of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 2923.

New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries.

Solomon Islands Ministry of Agriculture and Livestock.

New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries. Biosecurity New Zealand.

We need your help to keep watch for the brown marmorated stink bug. The brown marmorated stink bug (BMSB) is an agricultural, horticultural, and social pest. It's native to Asia and has spread throughout North America and Europe. It isn’t established in New Zealand, but this sneaky pest hitchhikes on passengers and imported goods. We’ve caught them at our border many times. We need everyone’s help to keep an eye out for them.

If you think you’ve found a brown marmorated stink bug – don't kill it.

  • Catch it.
  • Take a photo
  • Call us immediately on 0800 80 99 66.

Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Collaboration between Canadian governments, industry, academia and other partners in plant health is essential to protect our resources from new and emerging risks, drive innovation and ensure that Canadian industry remains competitive and sustainable. Plant health partners in Canada are pleased to announce the establishment of the Canadian Plant Health Council – fulfilling a multi-partner commitment to collaboratively implement the Plant and Animal Health Strategy for Canada. The Canadian Plant Health Council will address priorities for the plant health sector, working together on preventive approaches and activities to protect forests, agriculture and other plants from pests, diseases and other risks.

Australian Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts.
On 20 November 2006 the Biological Diversity Advisory Committee (BDAC), whose role it was to advise the then Australian Government Minister for the Environment and Heritage, held a one day workshop in Canberra on climate change and invasive species’ impacts on biodiversity. The various sections in this report are based upon topics discussed on the day, but they incorporate many additional findings drawn from recent research.
Tasmania Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water, and Environment (Australia).

Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.