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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection.

The Emerald ash borer was first found in Connecticut during the week of July 16, 2012. Since that first find in Prospect, EAB has been found in many other parts of the state, particularly in towns in central and western Connecticut. DEEP, the CT Agricultural Experiment Station, USDA APHIS PPQ and the U.S. Forest Service are working together with local partners to slow the spread of the insect and to take steps to minimize its impact. This will be a long-term effort on the part of all involved.

Idaho Department of Agriculture.
King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Fish & Wildlife Department.
Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
Do you hike? Boat? Or camp? Check out these fact sheets for tips to reduce the chance of spreading invasives when you recreate on DCNR lands and in your own backyard.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
The Washington State Watercraft Passport is free and available for use by the public. The passport is primarily designed for Washington residents who regularly transport recreational watercraft in and out of the state, but is available to any boater. The passport can help boaters to keep track of the waters they've visited and aquatic invasive species (AIS) inspection stations they've stopped at.

Benton Soil and Water Conservation District (Oregon).

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.