An official website of the United States government.

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 7 of 7

Search Help

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Counties, municipalities, and weed management entities (including weed management areas) may apply for grants to address noxious weeds and invasive plants, with priority given to Palmer amaranth or other species on the Prohibited-Eradicate Noxious Weed List. This grant request is not to be confused with the Cooperative Weed Management Area (CWMA) grant program administered by the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR).

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

The newly consolidated Invasive Species Grant Program combines previous opportunities, such as the Aquatic Invasive Species Spread Prevention and the Aquatic and Terrestrial Invasive Species Early Detection/Rapid Response grants, to create a single grant program designed to support projects that target both aquatic and terrestrial invasive species. In addition, the Invasive Species Grant program allows applications for two new categories: Lake Management Planning and Aquatic and Terrestrial Invasive Species Research.

Pennsylvania State University.

An $800,000 grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will support a two-year effort to control and prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species across Pennsylvania, with an emphasis on the Lake Erie Basin. The funding, through the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative, supports efforts to implement Pennsylvania’s Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Management Plan. It will directly support nine field projects to prevent or control the spread of aquatic invasive species, including: targeted control of Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) in Pymatuning Lake; the removal of red-eared slider turtles from Presque Isle Bay; and surveys of Natural Heritage Areas within the Lake Erie watershed.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

In response to the increasing threat to our priceless lakes and rivers, Wisconsin has increased its support of local efforts to prevent the spread of introduced aquatic invasives by creating the Aquatic Invasive Species Prevention and Control Grants. Eligible waters to receive AIS prevention and control grants include: inland lakes, great lakes, rivers and wetlands.