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Invasive Species Resources

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DOI. USGS. National Wildlife Health Center.
Provides news updates and other resources
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
Smithsonian Environmental Research Center.
More than 50 non-native species have found their way to the Galápagos Islands, over 10 times more than scientists previously thought, reports a new study in Aquatic Invasions published Thursday, March 28. The study, a joint effort of the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Williams College, and the Charles Darwin Foundation, documents 53 species of introduced marine animals in this UNESCO World Heritage Site, one of the largest marine protected areas on Earth. Before this study came out, scientists knew about only five.

DOI. United States Geological Survey.

The Asian tiger mosquito can carry dread diseases like Zika, and yellow and dengue fever. After it vanished from Palmyra Atoll, an island in the tropical Pacific, USGS researchers and partners set out to find out why.

DOI. Office of Insular Affairs.
Doug Domenech, U.S. Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Insular and International Affairs this week announced $1,488,890 in fiscal year 2018 grants to combat invasive species and protect natural resources in the U.S. Territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as the freely associated states of the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of Palau. "Invasive species in the islands are disruptive for both marine and terrestrial resources in the islands, which already face a delicate balance," said Assistant Secretary Domenech. "Secretary Zinke and I are pleased to help control and eradicate invasive species in the islands in order to protect public health, livelihoods, and fragile environments and economies."
USDA. FS. Alaska Region.
Firefighting personnel can unintentionally transport invasive species on clothes, gear, and equipment from the lower 48 to Alaska. They can also unintentionally spread invasive species within Alaska, from infested areas to clean areas. Aquatic invasive species can also be spread any time water is moved from an infested area to another waterbody, when seeds, propagules, or larvae are carried in small amounts of water or trapped in the water-handling equipment. This booklet is a tool to help identify some of the invasive species of greatest concern in Alaska and also suggests BMPs that will help firefighting personnel avoid introducing or spreading them. It also identifies four invasive species that should be reported to authorities and how to report them. See also: Invasive Plants Publications for more resources.
USDA. FS. Alaska Region.
Partnering with a local Alaskan native community, the U.S. Forest Service has for the first time published a dual language booklet in English and a native Alaskan language, Yup'ik, to help educate the greater community in Southwestern Alaska on invasive species. This publication, Protecting Southwestern Alaska from Invasive Species: A Guide in the English and Yup'ik Languages, aims to explain invasive species concerns unique to Southwestern Alaska, which is home to a large community of the indigenous Yup'ik people.
USDA. Natural Resources Conservation Service.
See also: Technical Publications - Plant Fact Sheets for more resources
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) confirmed the presence of virulent Newcastle disease in a small flock of pet chickens in Coconino County, Arizona. This is the first case of virulent Newcastle disease in Arizona. This case is believed to be connected to the current outbreak of virulent Newcastle disease in California, as tests show the virus is almost identical to the virus causing disease in California. Virulent Newcastle disease is not a food safety concern. No human cases of Newcastle disease have ever occurred from eating poultry products. In addition to practicing good biosecurity, all bird owners should report sick birds or unusual bird deaths to their veterinarian or to State veterinary officials. Additional information on biosecurity for all poultry flocks can be found at www.aphis.usda.gov/animalhealth/defendtheflock.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

On October 10, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) in coordination with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and New York City Department of Parks and Recreation announced that they have eliminated the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) from the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. "I am proud to say that we have eradicated Asian longhorned beetle from Brooklyn and Queens," said Greg Ibach, USDA's Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs. "This officially marks the end of our 23-year long battle with this pest in New York City."

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

The United States Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has established a quarantine for European cherry fruit fly (ECFF) in New York. A portion of Niagara County is quarantined for the invasive fruit fly following the detection of 51 flies in 2017. APHIS and the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets (NYSDAM) are working collaboratively on this detection. The ECFF quarantine area encompasses approximately 92 square miles of Niagara County.
See also: Fruit Flies for additional information.

USDA. Natural Resources Conservation Service.
An invasive species is on the move and may be headed for Montana. Palmer amaranth, a giant pigweed, is known to have spread to at least 28 states, including Minnesota and South Dakota, but has not yet been reported in Montana. To prevent its spread into Montana, landowners are encouraged to check their fields to ensure the invasive weed is not present. It was a known contaminant in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) seed mixes but pollinator, wildlife habitat and cover crop plantings may also been contaminated. Producers with recent conservation plantings should check their fields to ensure this invasive weed is not present.