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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Montana Department of Livestock. Animal Health Division.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Ohio Department of Agriculture.

Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) today announced the United States Department of Agriculture's National Veterinary Services Laboratory in Ames, Iowa, has confirmed that an exotic tick, known as the Asian longhorned tick, has been found in Gallia County. "Due to the nature of this pest, the female ticks can reproduce without a male, so it only takes one tick to create an established population in a new location," said ODA State Veterinarian Dr. Tony Forshey. "This pest is especially fatal to livestock, so producers should practice preventative measures and be on the lookout for this new threat."

The Asian longhorned tick is an exotic East Asian tick that is known as a serious pest to livestock. U.S. Department of Agriculture first confirmed the presence of this tick in the U.S. in New Jersey in 2017. In the United States, the tick has been found in or near counties with large horse, cattle, and sheep populations. To protect against infestations, farmers should check their livestock for ticks regularly. If producers spot unusual looking ticks or large infestations, report this to your local veterinarian or ODA's Division of Animal Health at 614-728-6220.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

One of the most invasive weeds in the world is beginning to make its way into north Mississippi, announced the Mississippi Forestry Commission (MFC). "Cogongrass was introduced to Mississippi as a new forage crop, however, it is not palatable for livestock, not even goats will eat it," Bozeman said. "It also failed as an erosion control plant because it was too weedy. With no native competition or consumers, cogongrass spread rapidly throughout the Gulf South." There is widespread cogongrass infestation in south Mississippi, but the MFC is starting to see and get reports of the weed moving into the northern part of the state. If left unchecked, cogongrass could become a statewide problem.

Bozeman wants landowners in north Mississippi to be on the lookout for cogongrass on their property and the notify the MFC if they suspect the invasive weed has taken root. "The Mississippi Forestry Commission can offer assistance to landowners in north Mississippi who have cogongrass on their property," said Bozeman. "We can also come out and help landowners determine if what they are seeing is cogongrass or not." For more information and to fill out the program application, visit the Cogongrass Control Program. If you suspect you have cogongrass on your property, call your local MFC forester to come do a site visit.

City and County of Butte-Silver Bow (Montana).

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County. Anyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Please note the location of where the insect was found, egg masses, and/or infestation signs. DEC and DAM also encourage the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, furniture, and firewood for egg masses. Anyone that visits the Pennsylvania or New Jersey Quarantine Areas should thoroughly inspect their vehicle, luggage and gear for SLF and egg masses before leaving and scrape off all egg masses.

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today announced that although freezing temperatures will kill off adult spotted lanternflies (SLF), the public is urged to stay vigilant and report overwintering egg masses. In the fall, SLF will lay their eggs on any flat surface such as vehicles, firewood, outdoor furniture, stone or other items which can be inadvertently transported to new areas. If this insect becomes established in New York, it could impact New York's forests, agricultural and tourism industries. "To date, there has not been a documented spotted lanternfly infestation in New York, but I encourage the public to stay aware and be ready to report egg masses or other signs of this insect to help prevent infestations," said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos.

Assistance from the public is crucial in limiting the movement of SLF and protecting New York's natural resources. DEC and DAM are urging the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, outdoor furniture and camping equipment for egg masses or insects, and report any sightings by sending photos and location information to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Anyone that visits locations of SLF quarantines in other states should look for and remove insects and egg masses on items before leaving those areas. For more information, please visit DEC's spotted lanternfly webpage.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed the first spotted lanternfly hatch of 2020. The first instar nymph of the season was reported by a department employee while surveying for the pest in the upper northeast corner of Cecil County near the Pennsylvania border.

See additional resources on the Maryland Department of Agriculture's site for Spotted Lanternfly for up-to-date information. For questions related to the quarantine, permitting, treatment, or to report a sighting of the spotted lanternfly, especially outside of the quarantine zone, call 410-841-5920 or email DontBug.MD@maryland.gov. If you report a spotted lanternfly via email, please provide the location of the sighting and your contact information.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

The emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an exotic beetle discovered in the United States in 2002 near Detroit, Mich. Since then, it has spread to 35 states and five Canadian provinces. Mississippi and Florida are the only states east of the Mississippi River that have reported no EAB infestations to date. Originally from Asia, the EAB is believed to have entered the country on infested solid wood packing material or wooden pallets. The MFC will be conducting EAB surveys in multiple counties across the state later this year. The public is encouraged to be on the lookout for EAB signs and report them to the MFC immediately. Click here for more information about the emerald ash borer.

South Dakota Department of Agriculture.

The South Dakota Department of Agriculture (SDDA) has confirmed that an infestation of emerald ash borer (EAB) has been discovered in northern Sioux Falls. This is the first confirmed infestation in South Dakota. Emerald ash borer is an invasive insect that has killed tens of millions of ash trees in at least 32 states. On May 9, 2018, Secretary Mike Jaspers implemented an Emergency Plant Pest Quarantine in order to prevent or reduce the spread of the EAB. This emergency quarantine is effective immediately. For more information, see the Emerald Ash Borer in South Dakota website.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

South Dakota Animal Industry Board.
See also: Avian Health for more information

Ohio Department of Natural Resources.

Maryland Department of Agriculture.

The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed that a single adult spotted lanternfly has been found on a trap in the northeast corner of Cecil County near the border of Pennsylvania and Delaware. This is the first confirmed sighting of the invasive species in Maryland, and the department does not believe there is an established population of the pest in the state. If you suspect you have found a spotted lantern fly egg mass, nymph, or adult, snap a picture of it, collect it, put it in a plastic bag, freeze it, and report it to the Maryland Department of Agriculture at DontBug.MD@maryland.gov.

New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.