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Invasive Species Resources

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Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Montana Department of Livestock. Animal Health Division.
New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

These best management practices for water accesses have been developed by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources in an effort to reduce the spread of aquatic invasive species (AIS). By following these guidelines, providers of public and private boat access facilities can create visible and functional designated areas where boaters can clean and drain boating equipment and conduct other AIS prevention activities.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
An affirmation card reminds boaters and nonresident anglers of Minnesota’s aquatic invasive species laws. Watercraft owners and nonresident anglers must read and sign the affirmation during their regular license renewal, then keep it in their possession with their license. The affirmation, enacted by the Minnesota Legislature, is another positive step in the state’s proactive efforts to keep 95% of Minnesota lakes off the infested waters list.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.
Outreach and education is the most effective way to combat the spread of aquatic invasive species. The more people are made aware of the necessity of cleaning and drying boating and fishing equipment before using it in another waterbody, the less likely the aquatic invasive species will be spread to new waters. The following guidance/reminder sign templates are provided for you to download and use at private access points.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
Outreach materials are provided to help organizations and individuals promote aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention activities in their communities. Minnesota DNR's Invasive Species Program provides printed materials and design files, as well as providing review of AIS materials created by other organizations.
Ohio Department of Natural Resources.
Mississippi Department of Agriculture.
New York Department of Environmental Conservation.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

One of the most invasive weeds in the world is beginning to make its way into north Mississippi, announced the Mississippi Forestry Commission (MFC). "Cogongrass was introduced to Mississippi as a new forage crop, however, it is not palatable for livestock, not even goats will eat it," Bozeman said. "It also failed as an erosion control plant because it was too weedy. With no native competition or consumers, cogongrass spread rapidly throughout the Gulf South." There is widespread cogongrass infestation in south Mississippi, but the MFC is starting to see and get reports of the weed moving into the northern part of the state. If left unchecked, cogongrass could become a statewide problem.

Bozeman wants landowners in north Mississippi to be on the lookout for cogongrass on their property and the notify the MFC if they suspect the invasive weed has taken root. "The Mississippi Forestry Commission can offer assistance to landowners in north Mississippi who have cogongrass on their property," said Bozeman. "We can also come out and help landowners determine if what they are seeing is cogongrass or not." For more information and to fill out the program application, visit the Cogongrass Control Program. If you suspect you have cogongrass on your property, call your local MFC forester to come do a site visit.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.

Ohio Department of Natural Resources. Division of Forestry.

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

South Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. Exotic Species Program.

City and County of Butte-Silver Bow (Montana).

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation.

The New York State Departments of Environmental Conservation (DEC) and Agriculture and Markets (DAM) today confirmed that spotted lanternfly (SLF), an invasive pest from Asia, has been found in Albany and Yates counties. A single adult insect was discovered in a vehicle in the Capital District. In addition, a single adult insect was reported on a private Keuka Lake property in Penn Yan, Yates County. Anyone that suspects they have found SLF is encouraged to send a photo to spottedlanternfly@dec.ny.gov. Please note the location of where the insect was found, egg masses, and/or infestation signs. DEC and DAM also encourage the public to inspect outdoor items such as vehicles, furniture, and firewood for egg masses. Anyone that visits the Pennsylvania or New Jersey Quarantine Areas should thoroughly inspect their vehicle, luggage and gear for SLF and egg masses before leaving and scrape off all egg masses.