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Invasive Species Resources

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Washington Native Plant Society.
Lake Champlain Land Trust.

Great Lakes Fishery Commission.

The Great Lakes Fishery Commission is now soliciting pre-proposals and pilot project proposals for the 2021 funding cycle. The deadline is Tuesday, January 15, 2020 at 11:59 PM EST. Proposals are evaluated for relevance and scientific merit and against information needs identified by the Research Themes under which they are submitted. Proposals are encouraged to be cross-cutting and address multiple themes. See the theme conceptual diagram (PDF | 172 KB) for examples of how themes may intersect. See Applying for Funding for more information.

Native Plant Trust (Massachusetts).

Formerly the New England Wild Flower Society.
Lake George Association (New York).
Great Lakes Fishery Commission. Fisheries Management.
Chesapeake Bay Program.
Great Lakes Fishery Commission.

The commission funds projects submitted to the Fishery Research and Sea Lamprey Research Programs ranging from U.S.$10,000 to U.S.$100,000 per year (average approximately U.S.$40,000) that generally run for 2-3 years. For more information, review the current call for proposals. Projects that meet particular criteria can also be funded as pilot projects or through the Technical Assistance Program.

Great Lakes Environmental Law Center.
Great Lakes Law is an independent online resource (blog) by by Professor Noah Hall, which provides news, analysis, and commentary on all things wet and legal in the Great Lakes region. Includes various categories related to aquatic invasive species.
Environmental Law Institute.
A report by attorney Read D. Porter that examines coordination on aquatic invasive species (AIS) prevention among the Chesapeake Bay states. The report focuses on prevention-related legal authorities in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania in particular, and recommends actions to improve regional cooperation both within the existing regulatory frameworks and through potential amendments to state laws and regulations to enhance prevention.
Lake George Association (New York).
Lower Platte Weed Management Area.
Environmental Law Institute.
Making a List: Prevention Strategies for Invasive Plants in the Great Lakes States surveys plant listing programs in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, and Wisconsin to assess the effectiveness of listing as a tool to prevent the proliferation and spreads of invasive plant species.
Nebraska Weed Control Association.

Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum.

The rapid spread of buffelgrass through the Sonoran Desert rivals climate change and water scarcity as our region's most pressing environmental issue. Buffelgrass is one of many plants that were brought here from other parts of the world. Lacking the insects, diseases, and other organisms that helped keep them in check back home, some have spread like wildfire, much to the detriment of our native plants and animals. Buffelgrass is the worst of these invasive plants because it is not only invading our desert, but transforming our formerly fire-proof desert into a fire-prone grassland. The fight to control buffelgrass is the fight to save an ecosystem and some of the most magnificent stands of saguaros in the world. Volunteer for a buffelgrass pull, register your own buffelgrass pull, or request a presentation or ID guide.