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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program; Illinois Natural History Survey; Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

Invasive species – non-native plants, animals, or pathogens that cause harm to natural areas – impact both our economy and the environment. Their environmental impacts can affect outdoor activities such as fishing, hiking and birding. You can help prevent these impacts by becoming a hero and joining the more than 90% of outdoor enthusiasts in Illinois who are already fighting the spread of invaders.

Catskills Regional Invasive Species Partnership.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.

Lake Champlain Basin Program.

University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
These plants are known to be invasive or potentially invasive in Connecticut and are on Connecticut's list of Invasive and Potentially Invasive Plants. They are known to be present only in relatively low numbers at limited locations in Connecticut. These species should be considered for control and eradication efforts in the state when resources are available. If you find these species: Report your findings immediately to the CT Invasive Plant Coordinator at reportinvasives@uconn.edu.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
This guide is intended to assist with identification of invasive plants and provide information on controlling these problem plants. Included are both non-chemical means of control as well as information on proper use of herbicides where chemical controls are needed. The choice of control measure depends on the size and nature of the infestation. If dealt with early enough, invasive plant problems can often be eliminated by non-chemical methods. However, a herbicide-based approach may be required to control an infestation that has become well established or widespread.
Finger Lakes Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

Western New York Partnership for Regional Invasive Species Management.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.

See also: Manage an Infestation for more resources

St. Lawrence - Eastern Lake Ontario Partnership For Regional Invasive Species Management (New York).

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Reporting suspect and/or invasive species is very important! In Montana, where you report invasive species depends on what kind of plant or animal they are, so that the correct agency can respond to your report.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

To prevent and stop invasive species we need your help. You can take simple actions to help prevent the introduction and spread of noxious weeds and invasive species.

Montana Noxious Weed Education Campaign.