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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food, and Markets.

Cornell University. Cornell Wildlife Health Lab.

Cornell University. Cornell Wildlife Health Lab.

Cornell University. Cornell Wildlife Health Lab.

University of Georgia. Cooperative Extension.

Ohio Department of Agriculture.

University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Woody Ornamentals for more fact sheets.

Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forestry, Parks, and Recreation.

Firewood is widely recognized as a major source of non-native forest insect and disease infestations. A rule governing the importation of untreated firewood into Vermont went into effect on May 1, 2016. Visitors to Vermont State Parks, Vermont State Forests, and the Green Mountain National Forest may only bring firewood originating from Vermont or that is heat treated and in its original, labeled package. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer within Vermont, ash firewood that has not been heat treated should not be moved outside of the Emerald Ash Borer Infested Area in Vermont.
Lake George Association (New York).
Georgia Invasive Species Task Force.
The emerald ash borer is a federally regulated pest, which means its detection will trigger specific regulations that are designed to help prevent its man assisted spread. The USDA, GA Dept. of Agriculture and GA Forestry Commission have been working together to ensure that the regulations minimally impact businesses but at the same time, will limit the likelihood emerald ash borer will be moved in ash nursery stock, or in logs, mulch, firewood, and other similar items.
Kansas Department of Agriculture.
Since the emerald ash borer's initial introduction into the United States, it has been spread to many areas of the country by campers and homeowners who unknowingly moved infested firewood to uninfested areas where the beetles emerged and infested new ash trees. You can help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer into Kansas by not moving firewood across county lines. When buying wood for your home, buy only locally grown and harvested firewood. When camping, buy your firewood near your destination and burn all that you bring. If you suspect emerald ash borer on your property please call 785-564-6698 or e-mail your name, address, phone number and pictures of the suspect tree to ppwc@kda.ks.gov.

Vermont Invasives.

An emerald ash borer (EAB) beetle was detected in a tree located in Londonderry, VT. The mapped area in Vermont (PDF | 1.25 MB) to which "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations apply now covers:

  • All of Londonderry, Windham, and Landgrove;
  • Most of Jamaica, Winhall, Peru, Weston, Andover and Grafton; and
  • Extends into Chester, Townshend, Stratton, Athens, Mount Tabor, and Wardsboro.

October means that non-flight season Recommendations to Slow the Spread of Emerald Ash Borer are now in effect when moving ash from the infested area. With the heating season underway, and firewood deliveries actively occurring, it’s important to remember that untreated ash firewood should never move out of infested areas. Be sure that your purchase or transportation of both log length and split firewood will not unnecessarily spread EAB. There’s a lot of spread to slow: While the infested area map shows that high-risk areas for EAB include many towns, visibly infested trees still remain rare in Vermont. You can help by following the "Slow-the-Spread" recommendations.

Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets.

DOI. National Park Service.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Factsheets for more resources