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Invasive Species Resources

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California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Feral swine are an invasive species which cause extensive damage to crops, property, and the environment. They are also known to carry over 30 diseases and 37 parasites that can be transmitted to livestock, people, pets, and wildlife. When feral swine are sighted in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health should be notified immediately. Attempts will be made to identify whether the swine are truly feral or if they are escaped domestic swine which are private property. Individuals who encounter feral swine should not destroy them unless they encounter feral swine on their own property and there is a threat of harm or destruction of property. As soon as possible following destruction of the animal, but always within 24 hours, the individual must notify the State Board of Animal Health (BoAH) at 701-328-2655.

University of California - Berkeley. Digital Library Project.
University of California - Berkeley. Digital Library Project.
University of California - Berkeley. Digital Library Project.
University of California - Berkeley. Digital Library Project.
California Invasive Plant Council.
CalWeedMapper is a new Web site for mapping invasive plant spread and planning regional management. Users generate a report for their region that synthesizes information into three types of strategic opportunities: surveillance, eradication and containment. Land managers can use these reports to prioritize their invasive plant management, to coordinate at the landscape level (county or larger) and to justify funding requests. For some species, CalWeedMapper also provides maps of suitable range that show where a plant might be able to grow in the future. The system was developed by the California Invasive Plant Council and is designed to stay current by allowing users to edit data.
University of Georgia. Bugwood Network.
University of California - Riverside.

University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.

ANR Publication 8218

Citrus Research Board (California).

University of California. Agricultural and Natural Resources. Kearney Agricultural Center.
California Department of Food and Agriculture. Citrus Pest and Disease Prevention Program.
New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services. Coastal Program.
Georgia Forestry Commission.
Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.
Georgia Forestry Commission.