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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Office of Water Resources.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Animals for species of concern
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
Following the detection of invasive aquatic mussel larvae in Nov 2016, the State of Montana's Mussel Response Team was formed to rapidly assess the extent and severity of the mussel incident impacting Montana's waterways. Aquatic invasive species (AIS), including diseases, are easily spread from one water body to the other. To protect Montana’s waters and native aquatic species, please follow the rules and guidelines... clean, drain, dry.

DOD. USACE. Omaha District.

A draft integrated letter report and programmatic environmental assessment has been developed to determine the economic and environmental impacts of federal participation in state-managed watercraft inspection programs along the Upper Missouri River Basin in Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota and Nebraska. Public comments on the draft EA will be accepted until March 2, 2021.

The existing watercraft inspection programs are managed collaboratively by the states of Montana, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota and Nebraska, where watercraft transported along highways are inspected for the presence of aquatic invasive species and decontaminated when detected. If approved, federal participation in the program would be cost-shared (50 percent) with each of the states, and would employ a regional strategy to identify locations that would provide the greatest likelihood of preventing the spread of aquatic invasive species to reservoirs operated and maintained by the Corps in the Upper Missouri River Basin.

Purdue University.
A major tool in the fight against invasive species is the Report INvasive website, hosted by Purdue College of Agriculture and the Indiana Invasive Species Council. The website includes several ways that people can report invasive species, including a smartphone app from the Great Lakes Early Detection Network. “There are not that many specialists and experts covering the state,” Sadof said. “When there are concerned citizens reporting, however, we have many more eyes and a better chance of detecting and eradicating a harmful species early.”
Purdue University. Botany and Plant Pathology.

USDA. Natural Resources Conservation Service.

NRCS offers technical and financial assistance to help farmers, ranchers and forest managers.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.

Trying to reduce the spread of invasive species in Rhode Island waters, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM) has amended the state's Freshwater Fisheries Regulations to prohibit the transport of any plant or plant part into or out of any Rhode Island waterbody on any type of boat, motor, trailer, fishing supplies, or gear. The new regulation carries a $100 fine for each violation. "Many of the aquatic invasive plants in Rhode Island can reproduce from just one small plant fragment and do not need entire root systems to successfully establish in a new spot," said Katie DeGoosh-DiMarzio, Environmental Analyst with DEM's Office of Water Resources. "Cleaning off every bit of plant from recreational gear used at one pond is essential before visiting another — this includes boats, kayaks, canoes, motors, trailers, paddles, jet skis, fishing gear, waders, water tubes, and anchors. These efforts help combat the spread of aquatic invasive species in Rhode Island waterbodies."

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.

The Department of Environmental Management (DEM) is asking Rhode Islanders to monitor their beech trees for signs of leaf damage from Beach Leaf Disease (BLD). Early symptoms of BLD include dark striping on the tree's leaves parallel to the leaf veins and are best seen by looking upward into the backlit canopy. Drastic leaf loss occurs for heavily symptomatic leaves during the growing season and may appear as early as June, while asymptomatic and mildly symptomatic leaves show no or minimal leaf loss. BLD was detected in the Ashaway area of Hopkinton, Rhode Island, in 2020 and in coastal Massachusetts. Before these findings, the disease was only known to be in Ohio, Pennsylvania, New York, and Connecticut.

Because of the seemingly random nature of disease in Rhode Island, DEM encourages homeowners and forest landowners to monitor their beech trees and report any suspected cases of BLD on DEM's Invasive Species Sighting Report webpage. Although BLD is relatively new in the U.S. and information is limited, links to additional information about the disease and photos are posted on the Division of Forest Environment's Current Threats page. If people have further questions, they should contact a licensed arborist or email Nancy Stairs, forestry program supervisor in DEM's Division of Forest Environment, via Nancy.Stairs@dem.ri.gov.

Rhode Island Invasive Species Council.
The Rhode Island Invasive Species Council is an outreach program of the Rhode Island Natural History Survey, The Rhode Island Agricultural Experiment Station, and The University of Rhode Island Cooperative Extension.

DOC. NOAA. National Sea Grant Office.

Provides contact information for State Sea Grant Programs Websites. The Sea Grant Directors lead the 33 Sea Grant programs, the National Sea Grant Law Center, and the National Sea Grant Library based at top universities in every coastal and Great Lakes state, Puerto Rico, and Guam, working to bring the robust intellectual capacity in place at these universities to bear on important societal problems. They coordinate program activities, setting local, regional and national priorities, and work as part of a national network to help citizens and businesses understand, conserve and better utilize America’s coastal, ocean and Great Lakes resources.

Southern Indiana Cooperative Invasives Management.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council. Montana Invasive Species.

Feral swine are highly destructive and potentially dangerous animals. Biologists describe feral swine as any swine not confined in fences. Their spread is blamed for an estimated $1.5 billion worth of damage to crops, wildlife, and the environment. To prevent the introduction of feral swine into Montana, the 2015 Legislature prohibited the transportation, possession, and hunting of feral swine. There are no known established populations in Montana, although there are populations as close as North Dakota and Saskatchewan. Early detection and rapid response are the keys to success. Eradicating small populations and minimizing the impacts of these invasive species are important to protect the economy and natural resources of the region. If you see a feral swine, report it immediately by calling 406-444-2976.