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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 18 of 18

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Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Agriculture.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS), provides a more accurate picture of the distribution of invasive species. EDDMapS will allow land managers, agencies and others to set priorities for early detection and rapid response (EDRR), as well as formulate overall invasive plant management action plans. Includes distribution data by species and by county.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

Includes invasive species by category for insects, diseases, plants, and animals.
See also: Invasive Species Status Report by Congressional District

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
EDDMapS West provides a means of reporting new sightings of select invasive species in Missouri River Watershed Coalition States, a mechanism for alerting appropriate individuals to the reports, and generates distribution maps for the reported species. Available through the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store.
Emerald Ash Borer Information Network.
See "EAB Locations" section, includes state maps

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

First Detector, a program of the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN), equips a nationwide network of individuals to rapidly detect and report the presence of invasive, exotic plant pathogens, arthropods, nematodes, and weeds. If you suspect the presence of a high-impact plant pest or pathogen, contact a diagnostician and submit a sample for diagnosis.

PlantPono.org.

The Hawai'i-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment (HPWRA) is a free service that provides a background check on plants. Professional botanists use published information to answer 49 questions about a plant, to predict whether it is a low-risk or high-risk of becoming invasive in Hawai'i or similar Pacific islands.

University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources; USDA. Agriculture Research Service; Hawaii Department of Agriculture.

University of Hawaii. Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit. Hawaii Biodiversity Information Network.

The Hawaii Early Detection Network was created to increase public awareness of invasive species and engage communities in the monitoring of their own neighborhoods. Find out how you help protect the environment of Hawaii by participating in the Eyes and Ears Team and attending an educational workshop or downloading your own field guide. If you are reporting a snake call 911 or for an animal call 643-PEST immediately!

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

USDAAPHISPPQCPHST. Identification Technology Program.

Nature Conservancy. iMapInvasives.

Includes a variety of published guides and internet resources (videos) for use in identifying invasive species that are found in the participating states, provinces, and regions of the iMapInvasives network. The iMapInvasives network is currently comprised of various U.S. states and one Canadian province (Arizona, Florida, Kentucky, Maine, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia, and in Canada - Saskatchewan).

Nature Conservancy. iMapInvasives.
i is an invasive species reporting and data management tool that is on-line and map-based. The primary focus for iMapInvasives is to track invasive species locations and management efforts. iMapInvasives tools can be used by citizen scientists, land owners, natural resources managers, and others who are working to prevent, control, or manage invasive species.
See also: The iMapInvasives Network is comprised of organizations that host the iMapInvasives Network database in their respective state or province.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Reporting suspect and/or invasive species is very important! In Montana, where you report invasive species depends on what kind of plant or animal they are, so that the correct agency can respond to your report.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

NPDN is a national network of diagnostic laboratories that rapidly and accurately detect and report pathogens that cause plant diseases of national interest, particularly those that could be deemed to be a biosecurity risk. The specific purpose of the NPDN is to provide a cohesive, distributed system to quickly detect and identify pests and pathogens of concern.

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
We are currently monitoring these exotic pests as part of the Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS). If you think you've discovered a pest not native to Rhode Island, and particularly if you suspect the pest to be the Asian Longhorned Beetle or the Emerald Ash Borer, please report it.
USDA. APHIS. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS). National Agricultural Pest Information System (NAPIS).
Provides State pest detection contacts, recent state exotic pest news, links to state pest resources, and a list of state CAPS survey targets.

National Information System for the Regional IPM Centers.

Provides various key contacts, coordinators and experts.