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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Oklahoma State University. Entomology & Plant Pathology.
Montana Department of Livestock. Animal Health Division.

Virginia Tech. Department of Entomology.

Oklahoma State University. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

Vermont Department of Health.

State Agriculture and Health officials announced that the Asian Tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) has been identified for the first time in Vermont. This normally tropical/subtropical species is a known disease vector for Zika, chikungunya and dengue viruses, infecting humans in countries where these diseases are present. The mosquitoes found in Vermont do not currently carry these viruses. Natalie Kwit, public health veterinarian with the Vermont Department of Health, said that while the discovery of Aedes albopictus in the state is notable, Vermont's climate is currently inhospitable for the mosquito species for most of the year, making it unlikely they will be spreading new diseases here any time soon. "The diseases they can carry are not endemic to our area, and in fact are rarely found anywhere in the United States," said Kwit. For more information, visit Vermont's Mosquito Surveillance Program.

Montana State University Extension.
Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.
Boxwood blight (also called "box blight" in Europe), caused by the fungal pathogen Cylindrocladium pseudonaviculatum (=C. buxicola), was found for the first time in the United States in North Carolina, Virginia and Connecticut in 2011. The first reported infestation in the U.S. was in a North Carolina nursery and the disease was introduced to Virginia on plants from that nursery. Spread outside the two Virginia locations, both of which are fields owned by a single nursery, has not been reported. However, growers should be aware of the symptoms of boxwood blight and monitor nursery and landscape boxwoods for symptoms.
University of Vermont. Forest Pathology.
Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.

City and County of Butte-Silver Bow (Montana).

Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry. Oklahoma Forestry Services.
With the quarantine of ash trees in Arkansas, the threat of the Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) to millions of Oklahoma ash trees intensifies for southeastern Oklahoma, especially McCurtain and Le Flore counties. As the pest is literally next door, Oklahoma Forestry Services is asking Oklahomans to help prevent the infestation spread and be on the lookout and report any signs that the insect is in the state. Please notify Oklahoma Forestry Services at 405-522-6158 if you see signs of EAB infestation in ash trees. For more information about the Emerald Ash Borer visit www.forestry.ok.gov/tree-pest-alerts.

Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources.

Oklahoma State University. Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Diseases-Topical for more fact sheets
Oklahoma State University. Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology.
Note: Maps of potential range expansion for the red imported fire ant in Oklahoma and the United States
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
Montana Department of Natural Resources & Conservation.
"Forest Health Highlights" (FHHs) are an annual summary of forest insect and disease conditions in Montana. They summarize key findings from the Montana Forest Insect and Disease Conditions and Program Highlights report along with project updates specific to the Montana DNRC Forest Pest Management program.

Idaho Department of Lands.

See also: Forester Forums for more fact sheets

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
As part of the statewide effort to address the risks of invasive mussels, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks plans to create a new bureau to manage the prevention, detection and control of aquatic invasive species within state borders. The Aquatic Invasive Species Bureau will be housed in FWP's Fisheries Division, with plans to be operational beginning in March.