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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program; Illinois Natural History Survey; Illinois Department of Natural Resources.
Invasive species – non-native plants, animals, or pathogens that cause harm to natural areas – impact both our economy and the environment. Their environmental impacts can affect outdoor activities such as fishing, hiking and birding. You can help prevent these impacts by becoming a hero and joining the more than 90% of outdoor enthusiasts in Illinois who are already fighting the spread of invaders.
Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
The goal of Illinois Invasive Species Awareness Month (ISAM) is to provide resources and opportunities to help stop the spread of invasive species in Illinois - each and every person can make a difference, including you!
Barataria Terrebonne National Estuary Program.
Tulane and Xavier Universities. Center for Bioenvironmental Research.
Michigan's Invasive Species Program.
Michigan State University. Midwest Invasive Species Information Network.
The Midwest Invasive Species Information Network (MISIN) is a regional data aggregation effort to develop and provide an early detection and rapid response (EDRR) resource for invasive species in the Midwest region of the United States.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Reporting suspect and/or invasive species is very important! In Montana, where you report invasive species depends on what kind of plant or animal they are, so that the correct agency can respond to your report.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

To prevent and stop invasive species we need your help. You can take simple actions to help prevent the introduction and spread of noxious weeds and invasive species.

Montana Noxious Weed Education Campaign.

Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network.

Ohio State University Extension; Purdue University Extension; University of Illinois Extension.

The Weed Control Guide, a joint publication from the Cooperative Extension Services in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, explains the importance of weed control and gives suggestions on herbicide management strategies for corn, popcorn, sweet corn, soybeans, small grains, and forages.

River to River Cooperative Weed Management Area.

Michigan.gov.

The Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) is asking the public to be on the lookout for spotted lanternfly, an invasive insect with the potential to seriously affect Michigan's agriculture and natural resources. This insect could damage or kill more than 70 varieties of crops and plants including grapes, apples, hops and hardwood trees. To date, spotted lanternfly has not been detected in Michigan. First found in the United States in 2014 in southeastern Pennsylvania, spotted lanternfly has been spreading rapidly across the nation. Infestations have been confirmed in Delaware, Virginia, New Jersey, Maryland and West Virginia. If you find a spotted lanternfly egg mass, nymph or adult, take one or more photos, make note of the date, time and location of the sighting, and report to the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development, MDA-Info@Michigan.gov or phone the MDARD Customer Service Center, 800-292-3939. If possible, collect a specimen in a container for verification. For additional information on identifying or reporting spotted lanternfly, visit Michigan.gov/SpottedLanternfly.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council. Montana Invasive Species.

Feral swine are highly destructive and potentially dangerous animals. Biologists describe feral swine as any swine not confined in fences. Their spread is blamed for an estimated $1.5 billion worth of damage to crops, wildlife, and the environment. To prevent the introduction of feral swine into Montana, the 2015 Legislature prohibited the transportation, possession, and hunting of feral swine. There are no known established populations in Montana, although there are populations as close as North Dakota and Saskatchewan. Early detection and rapid response are the keys to success. Eradicating small populations and minimizing the impacts of these invasive species are important to protect the economy and natural resources of the region. If you see a feral swine, report it immediately by calling 406-444-2976.

Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network.

Midwest Invasive Plant Network; Great Lakes Restoration Initiative.

The Woody Invasives of the Great Lakes Collaborative provides information related to woody invasive species identification, distribution, impacts, regulatory status, and control and management. The collaborative has also developed recommendations on trees, shrubs and vines that gardeners and landowners can plant as alternatives to known woody invasives. The WIGL Collaborative was founded in early 2018 and is coordinated by the staff of the Midwest Invasive Plant Network (MIPN).