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Invasive Species Resources

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Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Oregon Administrative Rules.
Scroll to view: Prohibited Species (635-056-0050)

Michigan.gov.

Some invasive species are legally designated by the State of Michigan as either "prohibited" or "restricted." If a species is prohibited or restricted, it is unlawful to possess, introduce, import, sell or offer that species for sale as a live organism, except under certain circumstances.

Michigan.gov.

Invasive species on the watch list have been identified as posing an immediate or potential threat to Michigan's economy, environment or human health. These species either have never been confirmed in the wild in Michigan or have a limited known distribution. If you think you have found any of these species in Michigan, please report the occurrence via the methods given by clicking on an individual species name. View the watch list as a printable PDF (PDF | 268 KB).

Oregon Department of Agriculture.
Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

USDA. APHIS. Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey (CAPS). National Agricultural Pest Information System (NAPIS).
Provides State pest detection contacts, recent state exotic pest news, links to state pest resources, and a list of state CAPS survey targets.
DOI. National Park Service; NatureServe. Explore Natural Communities.
Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Thurston County Noxious Weed Control (Washington).

Northwest Michigan Invasive Species Network.

Washington Administrative Code.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.

The Washington State noxious weed list is updated every year, and all Washington residents can submit proposals to add or remove species, change the class of a listed noxious weed, or to change the designated area in which control is required for a Class B noxious weed. Anyone, including citizens, tribes, organizations, government agencies, and county noxious weed control boards may participate in the listing process by submitting a proposal or by submitting testimony about proposed changes to the noxious weed list. In fact, Washington's open, inclusive listing process is lauded by other states for its encouragement of public participation. Learn more about the listing process here.