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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.

Orange County Vector Control District (California).

See also: Information Bulletins on other vectors/pests

San Bernardino County (California). Department of Public Health.

See also: Mosquito & Vector Control for more resources 

Plumas-Sierra Noxious Weeds Management Group (California).
See also: Agricultural Brochures for more species
Plumas-Sierra Noxious Weeds Management Group (California).
See also: Agricultural Brochures for more species
Plumas-Sierra Noxious Weeds Management Group (California).
See also: Agricultural Brochures for more species

Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.

Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.

Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.

Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.

Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.

Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.

Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Effective immediately, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is expanding the Phytophthora ramorum (P. ramorum) quarantine area in Del Norte County, California. APHIS is taking this action in response to the confirmation of P. ramorum in the county on September 19, 2020. The California Department of Food and Agriculture has established an intrastate quarantine for the areas in Del Norte County that mirrors the federal regulatory requirements as specified in 7 CFR 301.92.

P. ramorum is the pathogen that causes sudden oak death, ramorum leaf blight, or ramorum dieback. Sudden oak death was first reported in 1995 on tan oak in Mill Valley, Marin County, California. Through ongoing surveys, APHIS continues to define the extent of the pathogen's distribution in the United States and uses quarantine areas and public outreach to limit its artificial spread beyond infected areas. Details on APHIS-designated P. ramorum quarantine and regulated areas and the conditions to move regulated articles are in 7 CFR 301.92 and at the APHIS website.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Invasive Carp Regional Coordinating Committee.

The Asian Carp Regional Coordinating Committee announced the release of its 2021 Asian Carp Action Plan, a comprehensive portfolio of projects focused on Great Lakes protection.