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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Woody Ornamentals for more fact sheets.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Idaho Department of Lands.
See also: Forester Forums for more fact sheets
University of Idaho.
University of Idaho Extension.
This pocket guide has color photographs of all the weeds on Idaho's official noxious weeds list. Inside find maps showing each weed's distribution by county, leaf shape illustrations to aid in identification, and features to help distinguish the weeds from similar-looking plants.
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.
University of Idaho; Oregon State University.
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Pathology Extension Publications for more resources
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
University of Idaho. Rangeland Ecology and Management.
Prepared by: American Sheep Industry Association
DOI. NPS. Mammoth Cave National Park.
Bats are dying. Please help us protect them. A disease called white-nose syndrome (WNS) is spreading through the eastern United States, killing bat populations. White-nose syndrome is considered to be present in the Mammoth Cave System. It is believed that humans may contribute to the spread of white-nose syndrome by visiting contaminated caves or mines and then wearing the same clothing or carrying the same objects to unaffected caves or mines, transporting spores from one place to the other. You can help us save bats by following a few simple guidelines.
Idaho Department of Fish and Game.
White-nose syndrome (WNS) is a disease that is identified by the telltale white fungus growing on the noses of some infected bats while they hibernate. The Idaho Department of Fish and Game is asking the public to report the sighting of any active or dead bats during winter. Please call 208-454-7638 to report sightings. Idaho Fish and Game would also like to know of any sites that have hibernating bats so biologists can include them in the monitoring effort. Finally, the public is asked to not disturb hibernating bats and to respect cave closures.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife.