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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Purdue University (Indiana). Extension.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Entomology.
Officials with the Office of the State Entomologist in the University of Kentucky Entomology Department on May 22, 2009 announced two confirmed occurrences in Kentucky of emerald ash borer, an invasive insect pest of ash trees. These are the first findings of this destructive insect in the state.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.
University of Hawaii. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Disease Publications for more fact sheets.
University of Kentucky. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Plant Pathology Extension Publications for more resources
Purdue University.
A major tool in the fight against invasive species is the Report INvasive website, hosted by Purdue College of Agriculture and the Indiana Invasive Species Council. The website includes several ways that people can report invasive species, including a smartphone app from the Great Lakes Early Detection Network. “There are not that many specialists and experts covering the state,” Sadof said. “When there are concerned citizens reporting, however, we have many more eyes and a better chance of detecting and eradicating a harmful species early.”
Purdue University. Botany and Plant Pathology.
Michigan Sea Grant.

Michigan State University. Integrated Pest Management Program.

The Spotted Wing Drosophila (SWD) is a vinegar fly of East Asian origin that can cause damage to many fruit crops. This small insect has been in Hawaii since the 1980s, was detected in California in 2008, spread through the West Coast in 2009, and was detected in Florida, Utah, the Carolinas, Wisconsin and Michigan for the first time in 2010. This website will be the central location for dissemination of information about this insect. Check back for updates. This team is also helping to coordinate research projects to understand how best to protect fruit from infestation by this new pest.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.
Purdue University Extension. Weed Science.
Purdue University (Indiana). Extension.
University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.