An official website of the United States government.

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 5 of 5

Search Help
Delaware Invasive Species Council.
Be on the lookout for these up-and-coming invaders! They might not be in Delaware yet, but our best defense is early detection and rapid response!
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.

Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection.

The Emerald ash borer was first found in Connecticut during the week of July 16, 2012. Since that first find in Prospect, EAB has been found in many other parts of the state, particularly in towns in central and western Connecticut. DEEP, the CT Agricultural Experiment Station, USDA APHIS PPQ and the U.S. Forest Service are working together with local partners to slow the spread of the insect and to take steps to minimize its impact. This will be a long-term effort on the part of all involved.

University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
This guide is intended to assist with identification of invasive plants and provide information on controlling these problem plants. Included are both non-chemical means of control as well as information on proper use of herbicides where chemical controls are needed. The choice of control measure depends on the size and nature of the infestation. If dealt with early enough, invasive plant problems can often be eliminated by non-chemical methods. However, a herbicide-based approach may be required to control an infestation that has become well established or widespread.

University of Tennessee. Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources.