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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Click on "NH Laws and Rules Related to Aquatic Invasive Wildlife" to view list of prohibited wildlife.
DOI. NPS. Yellowstone National Park.
If you plan to use your own boat or angler float tube, you’ll need a permit and a free Yellowstone aquatic invasive species inspection. You can speed up the inspection process by arriving with a boat that is clean, drained, and dry. Watercraft that arrive dirty or with standing water will be subject to decontamination. Watercraft that cannot be properly decontaminated will be prohibited from launching.
DOI. NPS. Glacier National Park.
Glacier National Park waters are generally open for boating from mid-May through October. All watercraft require an NPS inspection and permit before launching. Prior cleaning, draining, and drying of all watercraft, both externally and internally, will reduce inspection time significantly.

Ohio Invasive Plants Council.

In September of 2014, the Ohio General Assembly granted the Ohio Department of Agriculture (ODA) the exclusive authority to regulate invasive plants species. Under the law invasive plants are defined as plant species that are not native to Ohio whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm, or harm to human health as determined by scientific studies. After nearly two years of stakeholder outreach, new rules have been established and are effective as of January 7, 2018. 

New Hampshire Code of Administrative Rules.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture. Division of Regulatory Services.

Montana Department of Agriculture.

The Montana Department of Agriculture (MDA) has issued an emergency quarantine order to protect against the introduction and spread of the emerald ash borer (EAB), a destructive wood-boring beetle that has already killed millions of ash trees in North America. The order was motivated by the removal of federal domestic quarantine regulations by the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (USDA APHIS). "It is important that we remain vigilant and do everything in our power to make sure that the emerald ash borer doesn’t find a way into Montana," said MDA Director Mike Foster. "This quarantine order protects the green ash woodland resources in eastern Montana that provide habitat for many wildlife species as well as economic benefits to livestock producers and rural communities."

Montana’s emergency quarantine order restricts EAB from entering the state in any form, as well as the movement of live ash trees, parts of ash trees capable of harboring live EAB, and any other articles determined potentially hazardous. MDA will accept public comment regarding the quarantine order until February 26, 2021.

Montana Department of Agriculture.
See also: Noxious Weeds for more resources

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

Includes lists of exotic controlled species, noncontrolled species, and prohibited species.

Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.

New this year, nonresidents launching watercraft in Montana must purchase a Vessel AIS Prevention Pass.  

  • The fee for motorboats is $30 and applies to all motorized watercraft that is registered in another state our country.
  • The fee for nonmotorized watercraft is $10 and applies to rafts, kayaks, drift boats, catamarans, and sailboats that nonresidents bring into Montana.
  • The Vessel AIS Prevention Pass expires Dec. 31 and is not transferrable between vessels.

Boaters are reminded that all watercraft coming into Montana from out of state must be inspected prior to launching. Anyone transporting watercraft must stop at all open watercraft inspection stations they encounter. To find a watercraft inspection station or to learn more, go to CleanDrainDryMT.com or call the FWP Aquatic Invasive Species Bureau at 406-444-2440.

New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.
See also: Invasive Plants for more resources

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

Serving the citizens of Arkansas and the agricultural and business communities by providing information and unbiased enforcement of laws and regulations set by the Arkansas State Plant Board.

Louisiana Department of Agriculture and Forestry.

Alaska Department of Natural Resources. Division of Agriculture.
Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Ohio Administrative Code.

Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.

Trying to reduce the spread of invasive species in Rhode Island waters, the Department of Environmental Management (DEM) has amended the state's Freshwater Fisheries Regulations to prohibit the transport of any plant or plant part into or out of any Rhode Island waterbody on any type of boat, motor, trailer, fishing supplies, or gear. The new regulation carries a $100 fine for each violation. "Many of the aquatic invasive plants in Rhode Island can reproduce from just one small plant fragment and do not need entire root systems to successfully establish in a new spot," said Katie DeGoosh-DiMarzio, Environmental Analyst with DEM's Office of Water Resources. "Cleaning off every bit of plant from recreational gear used at one pond is essential before visiting another — this includes boats, kayaks, canoes, motors, trailers, paddles, jet skis, fishing gear, waders, water tubes, and anchors. These efforts help combat the spread of aquatic invasive species in Rhode Island waterbodies."