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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Potomac Highlands Cooperative Weed and Pest Management Area.

This annual event calls for volunteer to help pull garlic mustard in sites in Tennessee and West Virginia. Garlic Mustard has gained much attention in recent years for its ability to rapidly invade wooded habitats from disturbed areas. Garlic mustard is highly invasive and threatens the abundant wildflowers and diverse forest ecosystem of West Virginia, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois. The CWPMA serves Grant, Hardy, and Pendleton Counties in West Virginia and Highland County in Virginia.

PlantPono.org.

The Hawai'i-Pacific Weed Risk Assessment (HPWRA) is a free service that provides a background check on plants. Professional botanists use published information to answer 49 questions about a plant, to predict whether it is a low-risk or high-risk of becoming invasive in Hawai'i or similar Pacific islands.

University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources; USDA. Agriculture Research Service; Hawaii Department of Agriculture.

University of Hawaii. Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit. Hawaii Biodiversity Information Network.

The Hawaii Early Detection Network was created to increase public awareness of invasive species and engage communities in the monitoring of their own neighborhoods. Find out how you help protect the environment of Hawaii by participating in the Eyes and Ears Team and attending an educational workshop or downloading your own field guide. If you are reporting a snake call 911 or for an animal call 643-PEST immediately!

Hawaii Invasive Species Partnership.

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

USDAAPHISPPQCPHST. Identification Technology Program.

Bishop Museum. Hawaii Biological Survey; University of Hawaii.
University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

Reporting suspect and/or invasive species is very important! In Montana, where you report invasive species depends on what kind of plant or animal they are, so that the correct agency can respond to your report.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council.

To prevent and stop invasive species we need your help. You can take simple actions to help prevent the introduction and spread of noxious weeds and invasive species.

Montana Noxious Weed Education Campaign.

Nebraska Weed Management Area Coalition.

Coordinating Group on Alien Pest Species; Hawai'i Invasive Species Council; Hawai'i Biological Information Network.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources; USDA. Forest Service.

Interagency partners in Minnesota have launched PlayCleanGo, an education and outreach campaign for outdoor recreationalists. The goal is to encourage outdoor recreation while protecting valuable natural resources. The objective is to slow or stop the spread of terrestrial invasive species (those that occur on land) through changes in public behavior. See how you can take action and stop invasive species in your tracks.

Potomac Highlands Cooperative Weed and Pest Management Area (West Virginia).

Potomac Highlands Cooperative Weed and Pest Management Area (West Virginia).

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council. Montana Invasive Species.

Feral swine are highly destructive and potentially dangerous animals. Biologists describe feral swine as any swine not confined in fences. Their spread is blamed for an estimated $1.5 billion worth of damage to crops, wildlife, and the environment. To prevent the introduction of feral swine into Montana, the 2015 Legislature prohibited the transportation, possession, and hunting of feral swine. There are no known established populations in Montana, although there are populations as close as North Dakota and Saskatchewan. Early detection and rapid response are the keys to success. Eradicating small populations and minimizing the impacts of these invasive species are important to protect the economy and natural resources of the region. If you see a feral swine, report it immediately by calling 406-444-2976.