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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

University of Florida. Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.

See also: IPM Florida - Invasive Plants for more publications

University of Florida. Emerging Pathogens Institute.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
See also: Common Disease Problems for more fact sheets.

Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant College Program.

Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.
Montana State University.
The Center for Invasive Species Management closed in 2015. Archives of relevant materials are available here.
University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
Provides information to find out how you can help stop the spread of invasive animals, diseases, insects, and plants.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.

University of Florida. IFAS Extension. Integrated Pest Management.

Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment.

The Asian longhorned tick, which preys on a variety of hosts including humans and wild and domestic animals, has been found in Kentucky. This new tick is known to attack animals in large numbers and will be a concern to livestock producers, wildlife enthusiasts and pet owners. The tick has been found in small numbers on elk in Martin County and black bear in Floyd County. It was found in large numbers on a bull in Metcalfe County in the south-central part of the state. Individuals who find a usually large number of ticks on their pet or livestock should contact their local veterinarian. Those who find single ticks they think might be an Asian longhorned tick should work with their county extension agent for agriculture and natural resources to submit the sample to UK entomologists for positive identification.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Entomology.

Pennsylvania State University. Cooperative Extension.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.