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Invasive Species Resources

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West Virginia Department of Natural Resources.

Anglers are reminded that West Virginia law prohibits the release of fish or other aquatic organisms into public waters, unless a stocking permit is issued by the Director of the Division of Natural Resources. Stocking permits are not required for trout and black bass stocking provided that disease-free certifications are obtained prior to stocking, or if trout originate from a source within the state. A permit is not required for stocking native or established fish into privately owned ponds. For more information on aquatic nuisance species please visit Stop Aquatic Hitchhikers!.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

To minimize the spread of invasive species, interested stakeholders have met to develop voluntary Best Management Practices for Invasive Species. These guidelines will help Wisconsin residents and visitors to limit the likelihood of moving invasive species around.
West Virginia Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife Resources.

Ohio Department of Agriculture.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Utah Department of Natural Resources. 

Aquatic invasive species (AIS) personnel from the Utah Department of Natural Resources (DNR) have stopped more than 120 mussel-infested boats this year, most of which had visited Lake Powell, from launching at other Utah waterbodies. So far in 2018, more than 100 mussel-infested boats have been quarantined, a significant increase compared to recent years. "The quagga situation at Lake Powell has worsened. If you boat at Lake Powell it's very likely your boat has quagga mussels on it," said AIS Program Coordinator Nathan Owens. "With more mussels in the lake and lower water levels more boaters have mussels attached to their vessels than in past years. Our techs are regularly finding them on and in boats that have only been in Lake Powell for a day or two — something we haven't experienced in the past." Boaters that visit another lake or reservoir after visiting Lake Powell will have their boat inspected again. If mussels are found the boat will be decontaminated and quarantined, if necessary.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin's recently revised aquatic invasive species (AIS) management plan is now final and available for use by the public after receiving approvals from the National Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force. Wisconsin last completed an AIS management plan in 2002. Wisconsin's AIS management plan serves multiple purposes, including maintaining Wisconsin's eligibility for funding and directing the AIS efforts of the DNR and partner groups. The new plan also introduces an invasion pathway management approach that will help Wisconsin systematically limit how invasive species move into and throughout Wisconsin. The plan can be downloaded here (PDF | 3.89 MB).

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.
Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources. 
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Clean Boats, Clean Waters includes teams of volunteers, as well as some paid staff from the DNR, Sea Grant and other organizations. Boat inspectors help perform boat and trailer checks, disseminate informational brochures and educate boaters on how to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species.
West Virginia Department of Agriculture.
The West Virginia Department of Agriculture (WVDA) opened an email hotline for the early detection of invasive pests. West Virginia citizens can send a picture of a suspected pest, a brief description of visible damage to buildings or plants and their location (nearest town) to bugbusters@wvda.us. Landowners will be notified if the tip raises concerns, and a site visit may be scheduled. See WVDA News Releases for more news.