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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Maryland Extension.
See also: Pest Threats for more fact sheets
USDA. Blog.
Maryland’s eastern shore has seen thousands of acres of protective marshland impacted by the nutria's destructive feeding habits. To protect the valuable resources of Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay, The Chesapeake Bay Nutria Eradication Project (CBNEP) began in 2002 to permanently remove invasive nutria from the marshes of the Delmarva Peninsula and to protect, enhance, and restore the aquatic and river ecosystems they damaged.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Sea Grant

Maryland Department of Agriculture.

Thousand cankers disease (TCD) is a disease complex native to the western United States and primarily affects black walnut, Juglans nigra. This disease is the result of the combined activity of a fungus, Geosmithia morbida, and the walnut twig beetle WTB), Pityophthorus juglandis. On January 12, 2015, the the Maryland Secretary of Agriculture issued a quarantine order to minimize the risk of moving infested material out of the limited action area in Cecil County, and to provide confidence in Maryland walnut products moving into neighboring states from non quarantined areas. The 2015 quarantine order has been updated to include all of Baltimore City and part of Baltimore County (PDF | 1.2 MB). The new quarantine (PDF | 1.0 MB) was signed on May 1, 2019 by the Maryland Secretary of Agriculture.

Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.

North Carolina Department of Environmental Quality. Water Resources.

Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.
The Minnesota Watercraft Inspection Program was created in 1992, in response to legislation proposed by the DNR, Minnesota Lakes Associations, and angling groups. In 2011, legislation aimed at strengthening Minnesota's ability to prevent the spread of aquatic invasive species was signed into law.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

North Carolina State University. College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

eXtension.

If a fire ant colony is flooded during a rainstorm or other high-water situation, the ants cling together and form a living raft that floats on the flood waters. Once the raft hits dry ground or a tree, rock, or other dry object, the ants can leave the water.

Footage Shows Massive Colonies of Fire Ants Floating in Hurricane Florence Floodwaters (Sep 18, 2018)
AOL News.
Floodwaters will not drown fire ants. In the wake of Hurricane Florence, victims in the storm's path are being warned to avoid wading through dangerous floodwaters (in addition to other reasons and threats).

North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. North Carolina Forest Service.
Emerald ash borer, laurel wilt disease, thousand cankers disease, and the European gypsy moth are likely to be brought into North Carolina in or on firewood. The use of local firewood is an important factor in preventing the spread of potentially devastating invasive species to our state's forests. Please keep this in mind as you prepare for your outdoor recreation activities. See Forest Health Invasive Pest Maps for more information about pest monitoring.
DOI. NPS. Mammoth Cave National Park.
Bats are dying. Please help us protect them. A disease called white-nose syndrome (WNS) is spreading through the eastern United States, killing bat populations. White-nose syndrome is considered to be present in the Mammoth Cave System. It is believed that humans may contribute to the spread of white-nose syndrome by visiting contaminated caves or mines and then wearing the same clothing or carrying the same objects to unaffected caves or mines, transporting spores from one place to the other. You can help us save bats by following a few simple guidelines.
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife.

University of Kentucky. College of Agriculturel, Food, and Environment. Department of Forestry and Natural Resources.

University of Kentucky. Kentucky Cooperative Agricultural Pest Survey.
The more people we have looking for invasive pests, the better our chances are to prevent establishment of the pest in Kentucky. If you see a pest (insect, invertebrate, plant disease) that could be one of the exotics featured on this website, let us know!
Google. YouTube; North Carolina Sea Grant.