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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Nevada Department of Wildlife.
Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species
Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Department of Forestry, Parks, and Recreation.
Firewood is widely recognized as a major source of non-native forest insect and disease infestations. A rule governing the importation of untreated firewood into Vermont went into effect on May 1, 2016. Visitors to Vermont State Parks, Vermont State Forests, and the Green Mountain National Forest may only bring firewood originating from Vermont or that is heat treated and in its original, labeled package. To help slow the spread of emerald ash borer within Vermont, ash firewood that has not been heat treated should not be moved outside of the Emerald Ash Borer Infested Area in Vermont.

Missouri Department of Conservation.

Report feral hogs, don't shoot them. The take of feral hogs is prohibited on conservation areas and other lands owned, leased, or managed by the Conservation Department. Hunting hogs on other lands is strongly discouraged. Instead, report feral hog sightings to 573-522-4115, extension 3296 or online. The Conservation Department and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, along with other partners and hundreds of private landowners, are working to eradicate feral hogs in Missouri. When hunters shoot feral hogs, it complicates efforts to remove these pests. Hogs are social animals that travel in groups called sounders. Shooting one or two hogs scatters the sounder and makes trapping efforts aimed at catching the entire group at once more difficult, because hogs become trap-shy and more wary of baited sites. With their high reproductive rate, removing one or two hogs does not help to reduce populations. Anyone who observes a feral hog or damage caused by feral hogs should report it to the Conservation Department rather than shooting the animal so we can work together towards eradication.

Connecticut Department of Energy & Environmental Protection.

The Emerald ash borer was first found in Connecticut during the week of July 16, 2012. Since that first find in Prospect, EAB has been found in many other parts of the state, particularly in towns in central and western Connecticut. DEEP, the CT Agricultural Experiment Station, USDA APHIS PPQ and the U.S. Forest Service are working together with local partners to slow the spread of the insect and to take steps to minimize its impact. This will be a long-term effort on the part of all involved.

Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri

Washington Invasive Species Council.

A cornerstone product of the Washington Invasive Species Council is a strategic plan designed to build upon local, state, and regional efforts, while serving as a forum for invasive species education and communication. The Washington Invasive Species Council Strategic Plan provides priorities, and direction and formalizes the council’s commitment to invasive species control and prevention.

The council is seeking input from partners and the public on a strategy for 2020-2025, which builds upon the 2008 strategy and 2015 strategy and clarifies council recommendations and proposed actions. All are invited to review the draft 2020 strategy, and comment by e-mailing InvasiveSpecies@rco.wa.gov before December 10, 2020.

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington).

King County's Best Management Practices (BMP's) help landowners control weeds using a variety of options that consider characteristics of the site and keep negative side effects to a minimum. The Noxious Weed Control Program follows county guidelines of Integrated Pest Management (IPM). The goal is to maximize effective control and to minimize environmental, economic and social damage.

Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

Washington Department of Agriculture.

Washington State Department of Agriculture.

Asian giant hornet is the world's largest species of hornet. In December 2019, WSDA received and verified four reports of Asian giant hornet near Blaine and Bellingham. These are the first-ever sighting in the U.S. Canada had also discovered Asian giant hornet in two locations in British Columbia in the fall of 2019. If it becomes established, this hornet will have serious negative impacts on the environment, economy, and public health of Washington State. If you think you may have spotted an Asian giant hornet, report it using the Hornet Watch Report Form.
See also: Learn more about Asian giant hornets and WSDA’s program to eradicate them.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

To help combat the $1.3 billion threat invasive species pose to Washington's economy every year, the Washington Invasive Species Council is inviting the public to the frontlines of its work by detecting invasive species and reporting them on its newly improved WA Invasives app. The free app enables anyone to report a plant or animal by collecting photographs, geographic coordinates, and sighting information. Users recreating in the backcountry also can collect data offline, when cellular service isn't available. The app also acts as digital field guide.

Kentucky Department of Agriculture. Pest and Weed.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.
Lincoln County Noxious Weed Control Board (Washington).
See also: Weed I.D. and Options for Control for more species

Thurston County Noxious Weed Control (Washington).

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office.

Tribal, state and local governments will join forces at Lake Roosevelt this week to combat the spread of northern pike, recently recorded just two dams away from critical Columbia River salmon habitat. “We are at a critical moment in time where northern pike have not spread into salmon habitat,” said Kelly Susewind, director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. “If northern pike move downstream, the State of Washington will consider this an environmental emergency. We need to work together to stop northern pike.”

Vermont Agency of Natural Resources. Environmental Conservation. Watershed Management Division.
Early detection is vital to protecting Vermont's water bodies from harmful invasive plants and animals. With more than 800 lakes and ponds throughout the state, volunteers play a key role in our surveying efforts. Vermont Invasive Patrollers (VIPs) monitor water bodies for new introductions of invasive species and report their findings to the Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).