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Invasive Species Resources

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Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection.
Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Georgia Department of Agriculture.

Polk County Department of Land and Water Resources (Wisconsin).

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
Nevada Department of Wildlife.
The Nevada aquatic invasive species (AIS) decal requirement became effective Jan 1, 2013 through approval from the Nevada State Legislature in 2011. The AIS decal requirement was established to prevent the spread of harmful aquatic species threatening Nevada's waterways.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The goal of this project is to raise awareness about invasive species and to turn that awareness into action to prevent and to manage current and future invasions. The project consists of lesson plans and corresponding hands-on items designed to teach the story about invasive species. Each lesson plan has been aligned with Next Generation Science Standards, Common Core Standards, and Maryland Environmental Literacy Standards. Lesson plans in each module include activities for Grades 3-12.

Nevada Department of Wildlife.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

City of Chicago. Department of Environment.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

University of Maryland. Cooperative Extension. Home and Garden Information Center.
Have a plant or pest question? Questions from Maryland and the District of Columbia are answered by Home and Garden Information Center’s Certified Professional Horticulturists. If you are located outside of these areas, you will be asked to enter your state and county. Your question will be forwarded to the appropriate extension expert.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

To minimize the spread of invasive species, interested stakeholders have met to develop voluntary Best Management Practices for Invasive Species. These guidelines will help Wisconsin residents and visitors to limit the likelihood of moving invasive species around.

Montgomery County Department of Parks (Maryland). Park Planning and Stewardship Division.

Natural Resources Stewardship staff (NRS) has determined that many non-native invasive plants (NNIs) known to present a significant threat to the quality and biodiversity of the natural areas occur in this 37,000-acre park system. To support the park mission to steward these lands, Montgomery County Department of Parks has prepared fact sheets for park managers and maintenance personnel with easy-to-read information about mechanical and chemical control methods for several terrestrial NNIs.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Georgia Forestry Commission.

Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Illinois Department of Natural Resources.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.