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Oceania

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Spotlights

  • Australian Government. Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment.

    The exotic plant pest fall armyworm has been detected for the first time in Australia, in a network of surveillance traps on the northern Torres Strait islands of Saibai and Erub. Head of Biosecurity at the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, Lyn O'Connell, said the caterpillar stage of the fall armyworm, also known as Spodoptera frugiperda, damages many crops across Africa and Asia vital to human food security, such as rice, maize and sorghum. "Everyone can do their part to protect Australia from biosecurity risks like fall armyworm by being aware of what can and cannot be brought to Australia from overseas or from the Torres Strait region and reporting any unexpected pests, plant matter or soil."

    Adult moths of fall armyworm were detected in surveillance traps monitored by the Northern Australia Quarantine Strategy. These traps were set up as part of preparedness activities for early detection as fall armyworm is a strong flyer and has been spreading rapidly through Southeast Asia countries in recent months. For more information, see Fall Armyworm and Other Exotic Armyworms from the Australian Department of Agriculture.

  • Australian Invasive Species Council.

    A new report has identified an international 'bug superhighway' capable of carrying a large variety of environmentally destructive overseas insects into Australia. The study, led by Monash University, rated the environmental harm being caused by 100 of the worst overseas insect species and recommends a string of actions to keep them out of Australia. The most dominant group of invasive insects by far are the hymenopteran insects – ants, bees and wasps – making them the world's most environmentally harmful invasive insect species.

    "Our report found that environmentally harmful bugs, beetles, ants and moths are most likely to hitch a ride into Australia along an international bug superhighway made up of imported plants, nursery material and the timber trade," said report author Professor Melodie McGeoch from Monash University. The report identifies the international trade in cut flowers and foliage as a high-risk pathway for more than 70 of the species studied. Invasive Species Council CEO Andrew Cox said this is the first time Australian and international scientists have comprehensively analysed which invasive insects overseas are doing the most environmental harm and could therefore threaten Australia's natural environment if they breach the nation's borders.

  • University of Western Australia.

    New research from The University of Western Australia has shed light on why some invasive plants make a better comeback after a fire, outstripping native species in the race for resources.

  • National Environmental Science Programme (Australia). Threatened Species Recovery Hub.

    New research by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub has shown that invasive or pest species are a problem for 1,257 threatened species in Australia, or about four out of five species. The research which has been published in the scientific journal Pacific Conservation Biology also identified the top ten invasive species based on how many threatened species they impact. Lead researcher Stephen Kearney from the University of Queensland said many people may be surprised at which species top the list. “Rabbits, a plant root disease and feral pigs are the top three pest species impacting Australia’s threatened species,” Mr Kearney said.
  • Island Conservation.
    The future is looking a little brighter for seabirds in French Polynesia following the first successful removal of invasive rats in the Marquesas Archipelago. The project, implemented by the Societe d’Ornithologie de Polynesie (Manu), Island Conservation, BirdLife International and Association Vaiku’a i te manu o Ua, will protect a nationally significant population of 90,000 Sooty Terns. Invasive rats present on the island devoured seabird eggs and chicks and native plants. Free from invasive rats, seabirds can once again safely nest and native plants can grow tall and thrive.
  • South Pacific Regional Environment Programme.

    The New Zealand Department of Conservation (NZDOC) and the Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme (SPREP) officially signed a Declaration of Intent which sees the NZDOC become the first partner of the Pacific Regional Invasive Species Management Support Service (PRISMSS). The PRISMSS is a regional mechanism, which facilitates the scaling up of invasive species management in the Pacific. It provides management support for on-the-ground invasive species actions through streamlining and coordinating activities and invasive species management experts. It has five regional programmes, each with an expert who will lead in their respective field. One of these programmes is 'Resilient Ecosystem-Resilient Communities' in the area of relocation of species to restored habitat, which SPREP and NZDOC will be the leading experts of.

  • DOI. Office of Insular Affairs.
    Doug Domenech, U.S. Department of the Interior Assistant Secretary for Insular and International Affairs this week announced $1,488,890 in fiscal year 2018 grants to combat invasive species and protect natural resources in the U.S. Territories of American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the U.S. Virgin Islands, as well as the freely associated states of the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of Palau. "Invasive species in the islands are disruptive for both marine and terrestrial resources in the islands, which already face a delicate balance," said Assistant Secretary Domenech. "Secretary Zinke and I are pleased to help control and eradicate invasive species in the islands in order to protect public health, livelihoods, and fragile environments and economies."
  • New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries. Biosecurity New Zealand.
    Biosecurity officials are promising to take tough action against cargo vessels believed to be infested with brown marmorated stink bug during the upcoming risk season. The risk season runs from September to April, when stink bugs from the northern hemisphere are most likely to crawl into cargo heading to New Zealand. Last season, biosecurity officers intercepted more than 2,500 individual stink bugs at the border, mainly on vessels and cargo.
  • Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme. Pacific Invasives Learning Network.
    This resource is to assist Pacific island invasive species practitioners in their battle against invasive species. It includes the Pacific Invasive Species Battler Series on common Pacific topical issues and an option to see what new resources have been added lately. You can also search for documents, case-studies, reports and other media by selecting the appropriate "Guidelines" theme or objective, or use the general search function by selecting tags related to the resources.
  • New Zealand Department of Conservation.

    Predator Free 2050 is an ambitious goal to rid New Zealand of the most damaging introduced predators that threaten our nation’s natural taonga, our economy and primary sector. Join us in eradicating New Zealand's most damaging introduced predators: rats, stoats and possums. Going predator free will bring us a huge range of environmental, cultural, social and economic benefits. Predator Free 2050 aims at milestone goals in every four year period. Find out how far we've come since 2016.

  • Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

    Australia is lucky to be free from many of the world’s most damaging plant pests. Exotic plant pests are capable of damaging our natural environment, destroying our food production and agriculture industries, and some could change our way of life. Australia’s biosecurity system helps protect us from exotic plant pests. The Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment manages this system with state and territory ​governments, industry and the community. The Plant Health Committee has recently reviewed the National Priority Plant Pests that are exotic to Australia, under eradication or have limited distribution. These are the focus of government investment and action, including funding through the Priority Pest and Disease Planning and Response. While by no means the only plant pests of biosecurity concern, the National Priority Plant Pests serve to highlight the sort of threats Australia faces. View the National Priority Plant Pests (2019).

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this locaton, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Oceania.

Council or Task Force

Australian Invasive Species Council.

Partnership

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health; Invasive.org.
Produced by: Rod Randall, Western Australia Department of Agriculture
Note: Webarchive for Nature Conservancy's Global Invasive Species Team
Australian Plant Biosecurity Science Foundation.
The Australian Plant Biosecurity Science Foundation was established to follow the Plant Biosecurity Cooperative Research Centre (PBCRC) which finished operations in June 2018, supported with unspent funds from PBCRC.

Invasive Animals Limited (Australia).

The Centre for Invasive Species Solution is a national collaborative research, development and extension organisation, formed to tackle the ongoing threat from invasive species. Initially focusing on vertebrate pest threats.
IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.
Convention on Biological Diversity. Clearing-House Mechanism; Palau Office of Environmental Response and Coordination.

IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.

Pacific Biosecurity; Secretariat of the Pacific Regional Environment Programme; Pacific Community.
USDA. FS. Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry.

Centre for Invasive Species Solutions (Australia).

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. Center for Plant Health Science and Technology; University of California - Davis.

International Government

Western Australia Department of Fisheries.

Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

Bay of Plenty Regional Council (New Zealand).
Auckland Council (New Zealand).

Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

Formerly the Invasive Plants and Animals Committee (IPAC).
UN. Food and Agriculture Organization.
Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Australia).
Tasmania Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water, and Environment.
Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.
Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.
Outbreak reports on pests and diseases that are exotic to Australia, and are under official national eradication programs. Also provides information about a pest or disease that is no longer under an official eradication program if there is important information that the community still needs to be aware of.
See also: Pests and Diseases Image Library (PaDIL)
New South Wales Department of Primary Industries (Australia).
Encyclopedia of New Zealand.
Environment Canterbury Regional Council (New Zealand).
Greater Wellington Regional Council (New Zealand).
Secretariat of the Pacific Community.

South Pacific Regional Environment Programme.

New Zealand Department of Conservation.

Business Queensland (Australia).

Victoria Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (Australia). Agriculture.

Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

New Zealand Ministry for Primary Industries.
See also: Alerts for some of the major threats, pests and diseases facing New Zealand's primary sector.
Waikato Regional Council (New Zealand). Environment Waikato.

Northland Regional Council (New Zealand).

Northern Territory Government (Australia).
Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.

Academic

Marine Education Society of Australasia.

University of New Zealand. Massey University.

Professional

Food and Fertilizer Technology Center.

New Zealand Plant Conservation Network.

Manaaki Whenua Landcare Research (New Zealand).