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Home / Aquatic Invasives / Aquatic Invertebrates / New Zealand Mud Snail / New Zealand Mud Snail Resources

New Zealand Mud Snail Resources

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Aquatic Nuisance Species Task Force.

Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, Galveston Bay Estuary Program; Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC).

Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
State wildlife officials first discovered New Zealand mudsnails in South Boulder Creek in 2004 and are taking action to prevent them from spreading. The New Zealand mudsnail competes with native invertebrate species and can destroy forage important to trout and other native fishes. Learn more how to identify the New Zealand Mudsnails, how to stop the spread and how to report sightings.