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Nutria Resources

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University of Michigan. Museum of Zoology.
Oregon Sea Grant.
See also: Species Guides for more resources

California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service. Chesapeake Bay Field Office.

California Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Landowners, we need your help: CDFW has deployed nutria survey teams from the Delta through the San Joaquin Valley and needs written access permissions to enter or cross private properties for the purposes of conducting nutria surveys and, where detected, implementing trapping efforts. Landowners and tenants, we need your help (PDF | 598 KB); so CDFW can survey for and remove destructive nutria from your properties, complete and submit the Nutria Project Temporary Entry Permit (PDF | 207 KB).

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides state, county, point and GIS data. Maps can be downloaded and shared.

USDA. APHIS. Wildlife Services.

The nutria (Myocastor coypus), a large, semi-aquatic rodent native to South America, was originally brought to the United States in 1889 for its fur. When the nutria fur market collapsed in the 1940s, thousands of nutria escaped or were released into the wild by ranchers who could no longer afford to feed and house them. While nutria devour weeds and overabundant vegetation, they also destroy native aquatic vegetation, crops, and wetland areas. Recognized in the United States as an invasive wildlife species, nutria have been found in at least 20 States and most recently in California. The nutria’s relatively high reproductive rate, combined with a lack of population controls, helped the species to spread.

Pennsylvania State University. Pennsylvania Sea Grant.
See also: Aquatic Invasive Species: Resources for additional species information
IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.
Columbia University. Center for Environmental Research and Conservation.

National Biodiversity Data Centre (Ireland).

Smithsonian Institution. Smithsonian Environmental Research Center. Marine Invasions Research Lab.

DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
Provides distribution maps and collection information (State and County).
DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
Provides detailed collection information as well as animated map.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Wildlife and Heritage Service.

USDA. APHIS. Wildlife Services.