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Wild Boar Resources

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IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

Upper Columbia Conservation Commission; Montana Invasive Species Council. Montana Invasive Species.

Feral swine are highly destructive and potentially dangerous animals. Biologists describe feral swine as any swine not confined in fences. Their spread is blamed for an estimated $1.5 billion worth of damage to crops, wildlife, and the environment. To prevent the introduction of feral swine into Montana, the 2015 Legislature prohibited the transportation, possession, and hunting of feral swine. There are no known established populations in Montana, although there are populations as close as North Dakota and Saskatchewan. Early detection and rapid response are the keys to success. Eradicating small populations and minimizing the impacts of these invasive species are important to protect the economy and natural resources of the region. If you see a feral swine, report it immediately by calling 406-444-2976.