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Home / Terrestrial Invasives / Terrestrial Invertebrates / Asian Long-Horned Beetle

Asian Long-Horned Beetle

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Asian Long-Horned Beetle
Asian Longhorned Beetle, adult - Photo by Donald Duerr; USDA, Forest Service
Scientific Name: 
Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky, 1853) (ITIS)
Common Name: 
Asian long-horned beetle (ALB), starry sky beetle
Native To: 
Date of U.S. Introduction: 
First breeding populations discovered in New York in 1996 (Haack et al. 2010)
Means of Introduction: 
Arrived accidentally in cargo from Asia (Hu et al. 2009)
Impact: 
Destructive wood-boring pest of maple and other hardwoods (Haack et al. 2010)

Spotlights

  • USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) is announcing its plans for combatting the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio in 2020. "Just last year we declared eradication of ALB from Brooklyn and Queens in New York City, ending the city's 23-year-long battle with the beetle," said Osama El-Lissy, APHIS' Plant Protection and Quarantine Deputy Administrator. "This year, we've mapped out a sound strategy that will further our efforts to eliminate this pest from the remaining areas of this country where it still has a foothold."

    Every year, APHIS evaluates and determines the most effective options to achieve ALB eradication. In 2020, the ALB program will focus on inspecting trees in quarantined areas in New York, Massachusetts, and Ohio, and removing infested trees at no cost to property owners. The program will not apply insecticide treatments this year. In addition, program officials will monitor for the beetle’s presence inside and around each area, respond to service calls, conduct training sessions for compliance agreement holders, and perform outreach.

  • USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    Urges Public to Look For Invasive Asian Longhorned Beetle and Not Move Firewood

    August is the peak time of year to spot the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) as adults emerge from trees. That’s why the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is declaring August as ‘Tree Check Month.’ Checking trees for the beetle and the damage it causes is one way residents can protect their own trees and help USDA’s efforts to eliminate this beetle from the United States.

  • USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) and the Clemson University's Department of Plant Industry (DPI) are inspecting trees in Hollywood, South Carolina following the detection and identification of the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB). Tree inspectors from APHIS and DPI are surveying trees in the eastern portion of Hollywood around the property where ALB was found. Inspectors will ask for permission from residents to survey trees on private properties before they conduct surveys. Residents who live in the town of Hollywood can help by allowing officials access to their property to inspect trees. Residents can report the insect or tree damage by calling the ALB hotline at 1-866-702-9938 or reporting online at www.AsianLonghornedBeetle.com. South Carolina is the sixth state to detect an Asian longhorned beetle infestation. The beetle has previously been found in New York, New Jersey, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Ohio. Infestations have been eradicated in New Jersey and Illinois, and eradication efforts continue in New York, Massachusetts and Ohio.

  • USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

    On October 10, 2019, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) in coordination with the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, and New York City Department of Parks and Recreation announced that they have eliminated the Asian longhorned beetle (ALB) from the New York City boroughs of Brooklyn and Queens. "I am proud to say that we have eradicated Asian longhorned beetle from Brooklyn and Queens," said Greg Ibach, USDA's Under Secretary for Marketing and Regulatory Programs. "This officially marks the end of our 23-year long battle with this pest in New York City."

Distribution / Maps / Survey Status

Federally Regulated

Images

Videos

Selected Resources

The section below contains highly relevant resources for this species, organized by source. Or, to display all related content view all resources for Asian Long-Horned Beetle.

Council or Task Force

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Partnership
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

You can become a more effective First Detector by familiarizing yourself with invasive target pests and pathogens known to exist in the U.S. If you think you have encountered one of the species or disease complexes listed, report its presence.

Nature Conservancy. Don't Move Firewood.
IUCN. Species Survival Commission. Invasive Species Specialist Group.
Ontario's Invading Species Awareness Program (Canada).

New York Invasive Species Clearinghouse.

University of New Hampshire. Cooperative Extension; New Hampshire Department of Agriculture, Markets & Food.
The Asian Longhorned Beetle (ALB) was found in Worcester, MA in August 2008 and in Boston in July 2010. This insect pest poses a serious risk to trees and forests. ALB has not yet been found in New Hampshire. Help us by looking at the debris from your swimming pools. Whenever you clean your pool, look at the debris you collect in your filter and skimmers. Use this fact sheet (PDF | 1.22 MB) to compare collected insects to common insects. Upload pictures of any insect you think is a longhorned beetle.

North Central Integrated Pest Management Center.

See also: Pest Alerts for more resources

Federal Government
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
Public outreach and educational site (former Asianlonghornedbeetle.com site).
USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.
USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
International Government
Natural Resources Canada. Canadian Forest Service.
State and Local Government

Maryland Department of Natural Resources. Forest Service.

See also: Invasive Plants and Insects Fact Sheets for additional species to help control invasive species in Maryland.

New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection. Division of Parks and Forestry.

Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.
See also: Insect Factsheets for more resources
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri

Minnesota Department of Agriculture.

Ohio Department of Agriculture. Plant Health.

California Department of Food and Agriculture. Plant Health Division. Pest Detection/Emergency Projects Branch.
Academic

University of California - Riverside. Center for Invasive Species Research.

University of Vermont. Entomological Research Laboratory.
Oklahoma State University. Entomology and Plant Pathology.
Kansas State University. Kansas Forest Service.
Columbia University. Center for Environmental Research and Conservation.
Professional
Morton Arboretum (Illinois).

Citations