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Invasive Species Resources

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Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.
Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.
Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.
Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.
Australian Government. Department of the Environment and Energy.
University of Hawaii. College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources.
See also: Weeds of Hawaii for more species guides
Colegio de Postgraduados en Ciencias Agrícolas. Mexico.
Special Note: In Spanish
Cooperative Research Centre for Australian Weed Management.
Cooperative Research Centre for Australian Weed Management.
University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Cooperative Extension.
University of California - Davis.
DHHS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
DHHS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Includes final annual and cumulative maps & data from 1999.
Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection.
South Dakota Department of Health.
Invasive Species Council of British Columbia.
A joint agreement among Alberta, British Columbia, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Yukon tightens the grip on invasive species. The Inter-Provincial Territorial Agreement for Co-ordinated Regional Defence Against Invasive Species is a step towards better co-ordination among jurisdictions on both prevention and co-ordinated response if invasive species are detected in Western Canada. The initial scope of this agreement will focus on aquatic invasive species.
Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.
eXtension.

If a fire ant colony is flooded during a rainstorm or other high-water situation, the ants cling together and form a living raft that floats on the flood waters. Once the raft hits dry ground or a tree, rock, or other dry object, the ants can leave the water.

 

Footage Shows Massive Colonies of Fire Ants Floating in Hurricane Florence Floodwaters (Sep 18, 2018)
AOL News.
Floodwaters will not drown fire ants. In the wake of Hurricane Florence, victims in the storm's path are being warned to avoid wading through dangerous floodwaters (in addition to other reasons and threats).