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Invasive Species Resources

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USDA. ARS. National Genetic Resources Program. GRIN-Global.
USDA. ARS. National Genetic Resources Program. GRIN-Global.
USDA. ARS. National Genetic Resources Program. GRIN-Global.
USDA. ARS. National Genetic Resources Program. GRIN-Global.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
The UC IPM Weed Photo Gallery includes many, but not all, weed species commonly found in California farms and landscapes.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of California. Statewide Integrated Pest Management Program.
University of California - Los Angeles. UCLA Newsroom.
University of Maryland Extension.
See also: Pest Threats for more fact sheets
USDA. National Institute of Food and Agriculture; University of New Hampshire.
Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found a dramatic decline of 14 wild bee species that are, among other things, important across the Northeast for the pollination of major local crops like apples, blueberries and cranberries.

“We know that wild bees are greatly at risk and not doing well worldwide,” said Sandra Rehan, assistant professor of biological sciences. “This status assessment of wild bees shines a light on the exact species in decline, beside the well-documented bumble bees. Because these species are major players in crop pollination, it raises concerns about compromising the production of key crops and the food supply in general.”
USDA. Blog.
The National Feral Swine Damage Management Program, within the USDA's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service’s Wildlife Services (WS) program, has unleashed detector dogs as a new tool to help stop the spread of feral swine, one of the United States' most destructive and ravenous invasive creatures. This is a new tool, and WS will continue to train the dogs and use them to detect nutria, feral swine, and possibly other invasive species, in the future.
Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.
eXtension.
The Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) is a Web-based mapping system for documenting invasive species distribution. The majority of invasive species reporting in the U.S. occurs through or in cooperation with EDDMapS.

DOI. United States Geological Survey.

See also: Science Topics for related invasive species issues.
USDA. National Institute of Food and Agriculture.
A national cooperative effort (funded by USDA-NIFA) on Late Blight of Tomato and Potato in the U.S. This site serves as an information portal on late blight. You can report disease occurrences, submit a sample online, observe disease occurrence maps, and sign up for text disease alerts. There are also useful links to a decision support system, and information about identification and management of the disease.