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Invasive Species Resources

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Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Foundation.
See also: AREF - Publications for more resources

USDA. FS. Remote Sensing Applications Center.

Geospatial technologies such as remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) can reduce costs and increase the efficiency and effectiveness of weed management programs for certain weeds. This site provides information, technical guidance, and resources to help resource managers learn to use these technologies to predict weed invasion, map and monitor weeds, and educate the public about weeds.

Business Queensland (Australia).

Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Australia). 
Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Australia). 
Victoria Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (Australia). Agriculture.
Victoria Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (Australia). Agriculture.
Victoria Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions (Australia). Agriculture.
University of Minnesota. Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center.
DOI. NPS. Biscayne National Park.
Western Regional Aquaculture Center.
See also: WRAC Extension Publications for more fact sheets.

DHHS. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Zika virus disease (Zika or ZIKV) is a disease caused by the Zika virus, which is spread to people primarily through the bite of an infected Aedes species mosquito.

Washington Native Plant Society.

Tennessee Department of Agriculture.

The Tennessee Department of Agriculture (TDA) is advising forest landowners to monitor their sassafras trees after detecting new cases of laurel wilt disease in Robertson and Hamblen Counties. In the last quarter of 2019, the disease was detected in trees in Montgomery, Cheatham, Dickson and Williamson Counties. "These new detections of this invasive disease show a significant geographic jump across the state," State Forester David Arnold said. "This is yet another unfortunate example of an invasive pest impacting our forests. Landowners should take caution to prevent the spread of this disease if detected on their property."

Laurel wilt is a fungal disease caused by an invasive pathogen, Raffaelea lauricola, which can affect a range of plants, including sassafras and spicebush in Tennessee. Choked of water, trees wilt and die within a few weeks or months. Currently, no treatment has been developed that can cure laurel wilt disease or protect trees from infection. The best way to prevent the spread of laurel wilt is to avoid movement of firewood or other untreated timber. Tennesseans are urged to monitor their sassafras trees for browning of leaves, leaf loss, and staining in the inner bark. If you suspect your trees might have laurel wilt disease, contact Forest Health Program Specialist Sam Gildiner at 615-837-5439 or sam.gildiner@tn.gov. TDA Division of Forestry staff will assist in identifying the disease and recommending management actions, if appropriate.

Tennessee Department of Agriculture.

Three Tennessee counties have been quarantined for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) after detection of the forest-devastating insect, bringing the total number of Tennessee counties under a state and federal EAB quarantine to 62. Cheatham, Giles, and Maury counties have been added to the list of areas restricted for the movement of firewood, ash nursery stock, ash timber, and other material that can spread EAB. The tree-killing beetle was recently found in these three counties through the United States Department of Agriculture’s EAB detection program.

International Maritime Organization.

Amendments to an international treaty aimed at preventing the spread of potentially invasive species in ships' ballast water entered into force on 13 October 2019. The International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (the BWM Convention) was adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO), a specialized agency of the United Nations, to address this problem. The BWM Convention entered into force in 2017. The amendments formalise an implementation schedule to ensure ships manage their ballast water to meet a specified standard ("D-2 standard") aimed at ensuring that viable organisms are not released into new sea areas, and make mandatory the Code for Approval of Ballast Water Management Systems, which sets out how ballast water management systems used to achieve the D-2 standard have to be assessed and approved. This will help ensure that aquatic organisms and pathogens are removed or rendered harmless before the ballast water is released into a new location – and avoid the spread of invasive species as well as potentially harmful pathogens.

Adirondack Park Invasive Plant Program.
Maine Department of Environmental Protection.
European Union. European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control.