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Invasive Species Resources

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Australian Government. Department of Agriculture and Water Resources.

Produced by: Australian Department of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Forestry. See also: Aquatic Animal Diseases Significant to Australia: Identification Field Guide, 4th Edition
Cornell University. Agriculture and Life Sciences.
This guide provides photographs and descriptions of biological control (or biocontrol) agents of insect, disease, and weed pests in North America. It is also a tutorial on the concept and practice of biological control and integrated pest management (IPM). Whether you are an educator, a commercial grower, a student, a researcher, a land manager, or an extension or regulatory agent, we hope you will find this information useful.

Kansas State University. Agricultural Experiment Station and Cooperative Extension Service.

See also: Weed Management Publications for more resources
University of Massachusetts - Boston.
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum), also called Nepalese browntop, is an aggressive invader of forest lands throughout the eastern United States. Infestations can impact the diversity of native species, reduce wildlife habitat, and disrupt important ecosystem functions. Stiltgrass is considered one of the most damaging invasive plant species in the United States. Infestations spread rapidly and the seed can remain viable in the soil for up to five years. Correct identification is necessary before beginning any management activities. Fortunately, Japanese stiltgrass has a unique combination of characteristics that make field identification possible. This publication gives simple descriptions and clear pictures of these characteristics along with details on how to distinguish several common look-a-like species. Download the full PDF version of Field Guide to The Identification of Japanese Stiltgrass with comparisons to other look-a-like species, ANR – 1457 (PDF | 16.1 MB).
University of California - Berkeley. Cooperative Extension; USDA. Forest Service.
University of Idaho Extension.
This pocket guide has color photographs of all the weeds on Idaho's official noxious weeds list. Inside find maps showing each weed's distribution by county, leaf shape illustrations to aid in identification, and features to help distinguish the weeds from similar-looking plants.
Bishop Museum. Hawaii Biological Survey; University of Hawaii.
Környezetvédelmi és Vízügyi Minisztérium (Ministry of Environmental Protection and Water Resources, Hungary); National Ecological Network.
University of Richmond (Virginia).
North Carolina Department of Transportation.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
This guide is intended to assist with identification of invasive plants and provide information on controlling these problem plants. Included are both non-chemical means of control as well as information on proper use of herbicides where chemical controls are needed. The choice of control measure depends on the size and nature of the infestation. If dealt with early enough, invasive plant problems can often be eliminated by non-chemical methods. However, a herbicide-based approach may be required to control an infestation that has become well established or widespread.