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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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DOI. USGS. Wetland and Aquatic Research Center.
Provides fact sheets, maps and collection information for aquatic vertebrates and invertebrates occurring outside of their native range.
Wyoming Game and Fish Department.
North Carolina Administrative Code.
Oregon Department of Agriculture.
North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services.
Virginia Administrative Code.
New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.

Colorado Department of Agriculture. Conservation Services Division.

Mississippi Department of Agriculture and Commerce.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture.
The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture administers the Noxious Weed Control Law and Noxious Weed Control List and implements federal and state eradication and control programs when a noxious weed of limited distribution in the commonwealth is targeted by federal or state funding for suppression, control or eradication.
USDA. Natural Resources Conservation Service.
Virginia Administrative Code.

Oklahoma Invasive Plant Council.

The Oklahoma Invasive Plant Council has developed a list of invasive plants by region. These plants have invasive qualities and are present in the region or neighboring regions. These are species that are not abundant yet in the area, but should be monitiored, reported and controlled before they become a bigger problem in the state.