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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Conference of Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Governors and Premiers.

The Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Governors and Premiers have identified the "least wanted" aquatic invasive species (AIS) that present an imminent threat to the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River region. In 2013, the Governors and Premiers committed to take priority action on the transfer of these species to and within the region. Since then, the states and provinces have taken more than 50 separate actions to restrict these high-risk AIS, and the US federal government has similarly restricted four of the species. See also: Aquatic Invasive Species for more resources.

New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team; Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space.
Includes New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team Target & Watch Species along with all Widespread Invasive Species in New Jersey. See also Info Center for more resources.

New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team.

See also Info Center for more resources.

Maine Department of Environmental Protection.
Alabama Invasive Plant Council.
University of Alaska - Anchorage. Alaska Center for Conservation Science.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Based on years of experience and the latest science, APHIS developed a list of 59 pests and diseases that could pose a significant risk to U.S. food and agriculture resources. The list is not meant to be all-encompassing, but rather focus on the most impactful pests and diseases. USDA's goal remains to keep the U.S. free of these foreign pests and diseases.

North Dakota Game and Fish Department.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

APHIS created the webpage to make it easier for its customers to find critical information on pests and diseases of concern. With this tool, members of the public will have the information they need to report pests and diseases and together we can protect America’s agriculture and natural resources. This page lists all pest and disease programs managed by APHIS as part of its mission to protect American agriculture and natural resources. Users can search by type (plant, animal), keyword (avian, fruit fly, cotton), or by the specific pest or disease (coconut rhinoceros beetle, brucellosis). You can also scroll through the page, which lists the pests and diseases alphabetically and includes a corresponding image.  

Nebraska Game and Parks Commission.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission.
Scroll to view list of aquatic species banned in Pennsylvania.
Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management.

New Hampshire Fish and Game Department.

Click on "NH Laws and Rules Related to Aquatic Invasive Wildlife" to view list of prohibited wildlife.
Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism.
City of Chicago. Department of Environment.