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Invasive Species Resources

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Invasive Species Centre (Ontario); Great Lakes Forest Alliance.
Montana Invasive Species Council.
Montana’s economy could see more than $230 million in annual mitigation costs and lost revenue if invasive mussels become established in the state, according to a report released by the Montana Invasive Species Council (MISC). Commissioned by MISC and completed by the University of Montana Flathead Biological Station, the economic impact study provides “a snapshot of projected direct costs to affected stakeholders dependent on water resources,” said Bryce Christiaens, MISC chair. “It does not reflect the total economic impact to the state, which would be considerably higher.” View a one-page fact sheet (PDF | 484 KB) or the full report (PDF | 4.0 MB).
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
Doherty, T.S., A.S. Glen, D.G. Nimmo, E.G. Ritchie, and C.R. Dickman. 2016. Invasive predators and global biodiversity loss. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 113(40):11261-11265.
CAB International.
Invasive species are a global problem that cause economic, social, and environmental damage.

CAB International.

See the people and communities from Africa and around the world who are affected by invasive species.
California Native Plant Society.
In Fremontia, the journal of the California Native Plant Society.
Centre for Invasive Species Solutions (Australia).
A desire to avoid more extinctions is one of the drivers behind new research by the Threatened Species Recovery Hub which has identified invasive species as the no. 1 threat to Australian biodiversity with habitat loss a close second.
Global Invasive Species Programme.
Invasive alien species are more often than not pigeon-holed as an environmental or biodiversity issue, and consequently – especially in developing countries – do not receive due recognition by policy-makers. Yet the reality is that they are a major threat to human livelihoods, especially to agriculture and therefore food security, and are generally undermining human well-being. Moreover, ongoing globalisation and increasing trade are escalating the problem to critical proportions. We hope that this booklet will contribute towards a better understanding of these links and to placing invasive species firmly on the development agenda. See also: GISP Publications and Reports for more resources
National Invasive Species Council Secretariat.
To better understand the impacts of invasive species on infrastructure managed by the federal government an effort was undertaken by the National Invasive Species Council Secretariat to solicit feedback from those agencies. A questionnaire was sent out to the federal agencies that manage infrastructure to identify the impacts they have observed, how they are managing them, issues they have identified and resource needs. The research demonstrated that impacts from invasive species on federally managed infrastructure range from non-existent to significant. Identified gaps needing improvement include awareness and education of invasive species impacts, limited resources, insufficient policy, and lack of agency support. See also: NISC and NISC Secretariat Products for more resources
National Invasive Species Council.
Convention on Biological Diversity. Clearing-House Mechanism; Palau Office of Environmental Response and Coordination.
College of Menominee Nation Sustainable Development Institute.
Note: EAB impacts on American Indian Communities
CAB International. Blog.
The damage that invasive species can cause to the environment and the economy are well known, but impacts on human health have been much less analysed. However, invasive species can cause impacts ranging from psychological effects, phobias, discomfort and nuisance to allergies, poisoning, bites, disease and even death.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri
University of Alaska Anchorage. Institute of Social and Economic Research.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

New York State Department of Health.

DOC. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

New research by NOAA and partners finds that two species of invasive Asian carp -- the bighead carp and silver carp, collectively known as bigheaded carps -- could be capable of establishing populations in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron and affecting the health of ecologically and economically important fish species such as yellow perch. The research, appearing online in the journal Biological Invasions, is based on a new model that simulates interactions between the bigheaded carps and a range of fish species, including walleye, yellow perch, and groups lower on the food web over a time period of 50 years. Over 180 non-indigenous aquatic species have already become established in the Great Lakes, with a handful of these producing substantial negative impacts. While bigheaded carps are established in watersheds near the Great Lakes, they have not yet become established in the Great Lakes.

USDA. FS. Northern Research Station.

In addition to cleaning the air and water, forests hold a tremendous amount of sequestered carbon. When trees die and then decay on the forest floor, that carbon is released into the atmosphere, a phenomenon that is one of the drivers of climate change. A first-of-its-kind study by a team that included the United States Department of Agriculture’s Forest Service and Purdue University scientists finds that non-native invasive insects and diseases are reducing the amount of carbon stored in trees across the United States. The study, “Biomass losses resulting from insect and disease invasions in USA forests,” is available at: https://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/58371.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.