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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation. Natural Heritage Program.

Portland State University (Oregon).

Benton Soil and Water Conservation District (Oregon).

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.
Do you hike? Boat? Or camp? Check out these fact sheets for tips to reduce the chance of spreading invasives when you recreate on DCNR lands and in your own backyard.

Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Something troubling is taking hold in Oregon. Strange, exotic plants and animals are showing up in places where they don't belong. They are invasive species, and they're taking over landscapes, driving native wildlife away, and making everyone from ranchers to fishermen to wildlife managers nervous. What are these invaders? Where do they come from? And what can we do to stop them?

Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.

Virginia Tech; Virginia State University. Virginia Cooperative Extension.