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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Washington Native Plant Society.
Washington Sea Grant.

King County Department of Natural Resources (Washington). Water and Land Resources Division.

University of Minnesota Extension.

Forest pest first detectors are trained to quickly detect and diagnose early infestations of emerald ash borer, gypsy moth, Asian longhorned beetle, Japanese barberry, Oriental bittersweet and other pests, so that state and federal agencies can control the spread. Become part of the award-winning Minnesota Forest Pest First Detector volunteer program to help the public find new invasive species affecting Minnesota’s trees and forests, or attend as a refresher for those already active as Forest Pest First Detectors.

University of Minnesota. Extension.

Portland State University (Oregon).

University of Minnesota. Department of Forest Resources.

Welcome, Volunteers! Pesky Plant Trackers is a citizen science opportunity focused on two non-native plants, wild parsnip and Japanese knotweed. Volunteers use Nature's Notebook to collect important information by observing seasonal changes in leaves, flowers, and fruits.

Benton Soil and Water Conservation District (Oregon).

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Oregon Public Broadcasting.

Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. Washington Invasive Species Council.

Washington Pest Watch is a citizen science initiative led by agencies and universities at the front line in protecting our state’s natural resources and economy from invasive species. You don't have to be an entomologist or biologist to participate in the network; the majority of network members are everyday people who keep their eyes peeled for the signs and symptoms of high priority invasive species and report them to agencies to aid in detections and rapid response. Just keep an eye out in your yard, your neighborhood, or when enjoying outdoor activities. Be aware and report what you spot—it’s simple and easy.

Utah Department of Natural Resources. Division of Wildlife Resources. 
Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.