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Invasive Species Resources

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Agriculture & Horticulture Development Board (United Kingdom).
Southeast Exotic Pest Plant Council.
Iowa State University. Center for Food Security and Public Health.
DOC. NOAA. National Marine Fisheries Service. West Coast Region.
Colorado Parks and Wildlife.
Montana State University.
The Center for Invasive Species Management closed in 2015. Archives of relevant materials are available here.
Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
California Invasive Plant Council.
Carolinas Beach Vitex Task Force.
DOI. Fish and Wildlife Service. Chesapeake Bay Field Office.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Provides comprehensive information on cogongrass in Georgia along with links to other southeastern state efforts on cogongrass. To date, Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Texas have on-going research, education and/or control programs that are supported by university, state and federal agency cooperators.
University of Connecticut. Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture.
Texas A&M AgriLife Extension.

Indiana Department of Natural Resources. Entomology and Plant Pathology.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Veterinary Services.
Auckland Council (New Zealand).
University of California - Berkeley.
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.
GloBallast Partnerships Programme.
Building Partnerships to Assist Developing Countries to Reduce the Transfer of Harmful Aquatic Organisms in Ships’ Ballast Water, simply referred to as GloBallast Partnerships (GBP), was initiated in late 2007 and is intended to build on the progress made in the original project. This was initially planned as a five-year project, from October 2007 to October 2012, but was extended until June 2017.
Washington Sea Grant.