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Invasive Species Resources

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Montana State University.
The Center for Invasive Species Management closed in 2015. Archives of relevant materials are available here.
Barataria-Terrebonne National Estuary Program.
USDA. National Agricultural Statistics Service.
In 2016 NASS began to collect data on honey bee health and pollination costs. Provides reliable, up-to-date statistics help track honey bee mortality.
Convention on Biological Diversity. Clearing-House Mechanism; Palau Office of Environmental Response and Coordination.
Missouri Department of Conservation.
See also: For more information about Invasive Tree Pests (insects and diseases) that are not native to Missouri
University of Alaska Anchorage. Institute of Social and Economic Research.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.
Encyclopedia of New Zealand.
USDA. APHIS. Wildlife Services.
Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks.
HathiTrust Digital Library.
Thompson, D. Q. (1987). Spread, impact, and control of purple loosestrife (Lythrum salicaria) in North American wetlands. Washington, DC: U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service.