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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 17 of 17

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Cornell University (New York). New York State Agricultural Experiment Station.
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.
University of Wisconsin. Extension Lakes Program. Citizen Lake Monitoring Network.
University of California. Agriculture and Natural Resources.
Provides information to both growers and home gardeners, in two distinct sub-sites -- to get the basics on the insect and the disease it can vector, how to inspect your trees, how to treat your tree if you find ACP, critical things to do to help contain the insect population and deal with Huanglongbing (HLB), as well as additional information more specific to California.
University of Connecticut. Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture.
University of Wisconsin.

Clemson University (South Carolina). Regulatory Services.

Montana State University. Center for Invasive Species Management.
See also: Surveying and Monitoring for more resources
University of Missouri. Integrated Pest Management.
View current pest alerts for your region, or sign up to receive email alerts. Pest Monitoring Alerts are sent by e-mail to subscribers when pest captures reach significant numbers.

Rutgers University. New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station.

The Brown Marmorated Stink Bug (BMSB) is a significant nuisance for homeowners and can be devasting for farmers. Learn how to identify BMSB and how to report a sighting of BMSB (in all U.S. states/territories and several countries).

University of Minnesota. Extension.

University of Georgia. College of Veterinary Medicine. Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study.

Cornell University. New York State Integrated Pest Management Program.

Contains regularly updated map and list of counties of confirmed Spotted Lanternfly infestations and quarantines.

eXtension.

The Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS) is a Web-based mapping system for documenting invasive species distribution. The majority of invasive species reporting in the U.S. occurs through or in cooperation with EDDMapS.

University of Wisconsin-Madison.
The Wisconsin First Detector Network (WIFDN) is a citizen science network that empowers people to take action against invasive species through invasive species monitoring, management, and outreach. WIFDN provides training and resources through a combination of webinars, instructional videos, and hands-on workshops, in addition to providing volunteer opportunities to citizen scientists. Consider becoming a First Detector and help improve our network to minimize the impact and spread of invasive species in Wisconsin.