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Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources (alphabetically), with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

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Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (Australia). 

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

Feral swine can carry foreign animal diseases like African Swine Fever. While ASF has never been found in domestic or feral swine in the United States, there is no treatment or vaccine for it. That’s why surveillance is very important. Help protect U.S. pigs by immediately reporting sick or dead feral swine.

WHAT TO DO: If you find a sick or dead feral swine with no obvious injury or cause of death, report it right away. Call the USDA-APHIS Wildlife Services program in your State at 1-866-4-USDA-WS. Don’t wait! Quick detection is essential to preventing the spread of ASF.

University of Alaska - Fairbanks. Cooperative Extension Service.

The Alaska Integrated Pest Management program wants to recruit YOU as a Citizen Scientist. Our goal is to educate individuals who enjoy observing the natural world and are curious about learning more about what they see. The more citizen scientists looking for insect, plant and disease organisms throughout our state, the better informed we are on current issues that may impact our environment, natural resources and food supply.

Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. Division of Environmental Health. State Veterinarian.

In 2019, the Alaska Office of the State Veterinarian, in collaboration with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and the University of Alaska, began the Alaska Submit-A-Tick Program. Through this program, individuals who find ticks on themselves, their family members, pets, or wildlife (e.g. hunted or trapped animals) can submit ticks for species identification and pathogen testing. Researchers are asking Alaskans to submit ticks to help determine which tick species are currently in the state. Tick submissions will also help us learn more about how ticks are being imported into Alaska so that we can create effective strategies to limit their introduction. Ticks can transmit bacteria, parasites, and viruses that can cause diseases in humans and wildlife. Pathogen testing allows us to assess tickborne disease risk in the state.

Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (United Kingdom). National Amphibian and Reptile Recording Scheme.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

APHIS created the webpage to make it easier for its customers to find critical information on pests and diseases of concern. With this tool, members of the public will have the information they need to report pests and diseases and together we can protect America’s agriculture and natural resources. This page lists all pest and disease programs managed by APHISas part of its mission to protect American agriculture and natural resources. Users can search by type (plant, animal), keyword (avian, fruit fly, cotton), or by the specific pest or disease (coconut rhinoceros beetle, brucellosis). You can also scroll through the page, which lists the pests and diseases alphabetically and includes a corresponding image.

Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space; New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team.

If you have a smartphone, the power to protect the natural heritage of New Jersey is at your fingertips! You can use it to help stop the spread of invasive plants, animals and even pathogens that threaten the natural systems and economy of the Garden State.

Arkansas Department of Agriculture.

Located across approximately 39 states, feral hogs cause an estimated $1.5 billion annually in agricultural and ecological damage. The Arkansas Feral Hog Eradication Task Force is a group of agencies dedicated to eradicating feral hogs from the state. Accurately measuring the Arkansas feral hog population is part of that process. Sightings can be reported at the Arkansas Feral Hog Sighting Report Form.

Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.
The Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis, "ALB"), a pest of hardwood trees including maple, birch and horse chestnut, was first discovered in Worcester, Massachusetts in 2008. Since their discovery, $50 million in federal and state money has been spent to eradicate the beetle, and 25,000 infested trees in the Worcester area have been cut down in an effort to halt the spread. Use this form to report a possible Asian longhorned beetle sighting in Massachusetts or other states.

Hilton Head Island Municipal Government (South Carolina).

North Dakota Department of Agriculture.

Feral swine are an invasive species which cause extensive damage to crops, property, and the environment. They are also known to carry over 30 diseases and 37 parasites that can be transmitted to livestock, people, pets, and wildlife. When feral swine are sighted in North Dakota, the State Board of Animal Health should be notified immediately. Attempts will be made to identify whether the swine are truly feral or if they are escaped domestic swine which are private property. Individuals who encounter feral swine should not destroy them unless they encounter feral swine on their own property and there is a threat of harm or destruction of property. As soon as possible following destruction of the animal, but always within 24 hours, the individual must notify the State Board of Animal Health (BoAH) at 701-328-2655.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

Center staff design and publish comprehensive mobile applications that engage users with invasive species, forest health, natural resource and agricultural management. Previous apps were designed for specific areas of the U.S. Two new apps were recently developed for reporting throughout the U.S.:

  • EDDMapS app  - the Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System app will allow invasive species reports to be submitted from a smartphone while outdoors. Anyone can report an invasive species sighting, submit photos, provide sighting details, and document a negative survey. In addition to its reporting function, the app contains information on the top invasive species including common names, scientific names, general descriptions, habitats, and reference photos to aid with identification.
  • EDDMapS Pro app - designed for professionals; includes the ability to download offline map data if users are going to be in areas where internet coverage may not be available.

USDA. APHIS. Veterinary Services.

Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The Maryland Department of Agriculture has confirmed the first spotted lanternfly hatch of 2020. The first instar nymph of the season was reported by a department employee while surveying for the pest in the upper northeast corner of Cecil County near the Pennsylvania border.

See additional resources on the Maryland Department of Agriculture's site for Spotted Lanternfly for up-to-date information. For questions related to the quarantine, permitting, treatment, or to report a sighting of the spotted lanternfly, especially outside of the quarantine zone, call 410-841-5920 or email DontBug.MD@maryland.gov. If you report a spotted lanternfly via email, please provide the location of the sighting and your contact information.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.

Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS), provides a more accurate picture of the distribution of invasive species. EDDMapS will allow land managers, agencies, and others to set priorities for early detection and rapid response (EDRR), as well as formulate overall invasive plant management action plans. EDDMapS provides online tools for citizens to report invasive species sightings and maps these sightings to provide distribution information by species, state, and county.

University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
EDDMapS West provides a means of reporting new sightings of select invasive species in Missouri River Watershed Coalition States, a mechanism for alerting appropriate individuals to the reports, and generates distribution maps for the reported species. Available through the Apple App Store and the Google Play Store.

South Carolina Forestry Commission.

The emerald ash borer, a beetle pest that has devastated ash trees throughout the eastern United States, was officially detected in Greenville, Oconee and Spartanburg counties in August 2017. According to a Clemson University press release, the beetles were found Aug. 3 during a routine check of Emerald Ash Borer traps and confirmed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. In response to the discovery of EAB in the Upstate, the State Crop Pest Commission likely will establish a quarantine area involving at least the three affected counties; it is also possible the quarantine could be expanded to additional counties or even the entire state.

Massachusetts Introduced Pests Outreach Project.

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

First Detector, a program of the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN), equips a nationwide network of individuals to rapidly detect and report the presence of invasive, exotic plant pathogens, arthropods, nematodes, and weeds. If you suspect the presence of a high-impact plant pest or pathogen, contact a diagnostician and submit a sample for diagnosis.

University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.