An official website of the United States government.

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

This site is also protected by an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate that’s been signed by the U.S. government. The https:// means all transmitted data is encrypted — in other words, any information or browsing history that you provide is transmitted securely.

Home / Invasive Species Resources

Invasive Species Resources

Provides access to all site resources, with the option to search by species common and scientific names. Resources can be filtered by Subject, Resource Type, Location, or Source.

Displaying 1 to 20 of 66

Search Help

Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation. Division of Environmental Health. State Veterinarian.

In 2019, the Alaska Office of the State Veterinarian, in collaboration with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game and the University of Alaska, began the Alaska Submit-A-Tick Program. Through this program, individuals who find ticks on themselves, their family members, pets, or wildlife (e.g. hunted or trapped animals) can submit ticks for species identification and pathogen testing. Researchers are asking Alaskans to submit ticks to help determine which tick species are currently in the state. Tick submissions will also help us learn more about how ticks are being imported into Alaska so that we can create effective strategies to limit their introduction. Ticks can transmit bacteria, parasites, and viruses that can cause diseases in humans and wildlife. Pathogen testing allows us to assess tickborne disease risk in the state.

USDAAPHISPPQCPHST. Identification Technology Program.

ITP and the APHIS PPQ S&T Beltsville Lab are pleased to announce the release of IDphy: Molecular and Morphological Identification of Phytopthora Based on the Types, ITP’s first pathogen tool. This website offers PPQ and its partners the most complete, valid, and up-to-date resource for identifying the culturable species of Phytophthora. IDphy includes detailed standard operating procedures for all steps involved in culturing, sequencing, and identifying suspect samples, covering both molecular and morphological methods. Some species of Phytophthora are devastating plant pathogens that have a significant impact on agriculture and natural ecosystems.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.
APHIS created the webpage to make it easier for its customers to find critical information on pests and diseases of concern. With this tool, members of the public will have the information they need to report pests and diseases and together we can protect America’s agriculture and natural resources. This page lists all pest and disease programs managed by APHIS as part of its mission to protect American agriculture and natural resources. Users can search by type (plant, animal), keyword (avian, fruit fly, cotton), or by the specific pest or disease (coconut rhinoceros beetle, brucellosis). You can also scroll through the page, which lists the pests and diseases alphabetically and includes a corresponding image.  

Friends of Hopewell Valley Open Space; New Jersey Invasive Species Strike Team.

If you have a smartphone, the power to protect the natural heritage of New Jersey is at your fingertips! You can use it to help stop the spread of invasive plants, animals and even pathogens that threaten the natural systems and economy of the Garden State.

University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.

USDA. Agricultural Research Service.

Scientists from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Agricultural Research Service (ARS) have identified a new way to detect the presence of live African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV) that minimizes the need for samples from live animals and provides easier access to veterinary labs that need to diagnose the virus. "We have identified a cell-line that can be used to isolate and detect the presence of the live virus," said ARS Scientist Dr. Douglas Gladue. "This is a critical breakthrough and a tremendous step for African Swine Fever Virus diagnostics."

This research, which is highlighted in this month's issue of Viruses, was funded through an interagency agreement with the Science and Technology Directorate of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A provisional patent application for this research was filed in April 2020 and the technology is now available for license. ARS scientists at the Plum Island Animal Disease Center in Plum Island, N.Y. will continue to perform research and work towards finding tools to control the spread of ASFV in the nation.

USDA. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service.

University of Florida.

University of Nebraska - Lincoln. Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
University of Georgia. Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health.
Early Detection and Distribution Mapping System (EDDMapS), provides a more accurate picture of the distribution of invasive species. EDDMapS will allow land managers, agencies and others to set priorities for early detection and rapid response (EDRR), as well as formulate overall invasive plant management action plans. Includes distribution data by species and by county.
Auckland Council (New Zealand).
Alabama Cooperative Extension System.
Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum), also called Nepalese browntop, is an aggressive invader of forest lands throughout the eastern United States. Infestations can impact the diversity of native species, reduce wildlife habitat, and disrupt important ecosystem functions. Stiltgrass is considered one of the most damaging invasive plant species in the United States. Infestations spread rapidly and the seed can remain viable in the soil for up to five years. Correct identification is necessary before beginning any management activities. Fortunately, Japanese stiltgrass has a unique combination of characteristics that make field identification possible. This publication gives simple descriptions and clear pictures of these characteristics along with details on how to distinguish several common look-a-like species. Download the full PDF version of Field Guide to The Identification of Japanese Stiltgrass with comparisons to other look-a-like species, ANR – 1457 (PDF | 16.1 MB).

National Plant Diagnostic Network.

First Detector, a program of the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN), equips a nationwide network of individuals to rapidly detect and report the presence of invasive, exotic plant pathogens, arthropods, nematodes, and weeds. If you suspect the presence of a high-impact plant pest or pathogen, contact a diagnostician and submit a sample for diagnosis.

Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council; Orange County Government; University of South Florida.
FLIP (Florida Invasive Plants) is designed to be a mobile field guide that can be accessed by a computer, smart phone, tablet, or other device with internet browser capability. Developed in partnership with the University of South Florida (USF), FLIP currently contains 20 plants: 19 of the 2011 Category I invasive species and one of the 2011 Category II invasive species, as designated by the Florida Exotic Pest Plant Council (FLEPPC).
University of Connecticut. Connecticut Invasive Plant Working Group.

Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation, and Forestry.

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

USDAAPHISPPQCPHST. Identification Technology Program.

University of California - Berkeley. Cooperative Extension; USDA. Forest Service.

USDA. APHIS. PPQ. CPHST. Identification Technology Program.

Native to Asia, the spotted lanternfly has quickly spread since its initial detection in 2014. The insect is not a strong flier, yet its U.S. range is expanding, mostly due to the movement of vehicles, outdoor furniture, or other objects to which females glue their inconspicuous egg masses. Includes ID aids to help identify the spotted lanternfly in all its life stages, from egg mass through adult.