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Invasive Species Resources

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Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Foundation.
See also: AREF - Publications for more resources
Washington Native Plant Society.
Amphibian and Reptile Conservation (United Kingdom). National Amphibian and Reptile Recording Scheme.
Pacific Biodiversity Institute (Washington).
Entomological Society of America. Entomology Today.
Invasive insect and arthropod species make for a lot of scary headlines—think emerald ash borer, spotted lanternfly, and Asian longhorned tick, just to name a few. But success stories in invasive-species response are out there. They just need to be told. One of those success stories is the eradication of the European grapevine moth (Lobesia botrana) in northern California after it was found there in 2009. A cooperative, multipronged response effort kept infestations from running wild, and it was declared eradicated in 2016, two years after the last adult moth was caught in the region. The story of this effort is recounted, along with analysis of the invasion’s dynamics, in a study published in January in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America.
Australian Museum.
Tahoe Resource Conservation District.
Tip of the Mitt Watershed Council (Michigan).
American Veterinary Medicine Association.
Indiana Native Plant Society.
Lake Champlain Land Trust.
Island Conservation.
Restoring islands through the removal of non-native invasive mammals is a powerful biodiversity conservation tool. This new study now shows that human communities on islands could benefit from restoration actions, which can potentially reduce or eliminate the burden of diseases transmitted to people by invasive species. Simply put, removal of invasive species can benefit human health in addition to ecological health.

Aquatic Ecosystem Restoration Foundation.

This third edition has been specifically designed with water resource managers, water management associations, homeowners and customers and operators of aquatic plant management companies and districts in mind. The goal in preparing this handbook is to provide basic, scientifically sound information to assist decision makers with their water management questions.