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Invasive Species Resources

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University of Arkansas. Cooperative Extension Service.
The collection of digital images is provided as a service to Arkansas agriculture. These images represent symptoms of both pathological (infectious) and non-pathological (physiological/environmental) disorders of agronomic row crops and horticultural crops that grow in Arkansas. These photos are useful as an identification tool to growers of the crops listed.
University of Hawaii. Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. Integrated Pest Management Program.
Provides general information on pest hosts, distribution, damage, biology, and management in the form of pest summaries.
Mississippi State University. Geosystems Research Institute.

Brock University (Canada).

The Niagara Region’s Aquatic and Riparian Invasive Species Control Database (created by Lyn A. Brown as part of a Master of Sustainability thesis at Brock University) provides a baseline for the 2017/18 state of aquatic and riparian invasive management activities in the Niagara Region of Ontario. An interactive GIS map uses the database information to show where those control efforts are occurring, and users can filter points on the map by invasive species, control type, control effectiveness, or organization.

Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Robert H. Smith Faculty of Agriculture, Food, and Environment.