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Invasive Species Resources

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Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.
Washington State Noxious Weed Control Board.

Georgia Forestry Commission.

Cogongrass, Imperata cylindrica (L.), is considered the seventh worst weed in the world and listed as a federal noxious weed by USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service - Plant Protection and Quarantine. Cogongrass infestations are being found primarily in south Georgia but is capable of growing throughout the state. Join the cogongrass eradication team in Georgia and be a part of protecting our state's forest and wildlife habitat. Report a potential cogongrass sighting online or call your local GFC Forester.

Mississippi Forestry Commission.

One of the most invasive weeds in the world is beginning to make its way into north Mississippi, announced the Mississippi Forestry Commission (MFC). "Cogongrass was introduced to Mississippi as a new forage crop, however, it is not palatable for livestock, not even goats will eat it," Bozeman said. "It also failed as an erosion control plant because it was too weedy. With no native competition or consumers, cogongrass spread rapidly throughout the Gulf South." There is widespread cogongrass infestation in south Mississippi, but the MFC is starting to see and get reports of the weed moving into the northern part of the state. If left unchecked, cogongrass could become a statewide problem.

Bozeman wants landowners in north Mississippi to be on the lookout for cogongrass on their property and the notify the MFC if they suspect the invasive weed has taken root. "The Mississippi Forestry Commission can offer assistance to landowners in north Mississippi who have cogongrass on their property," said Bozeman. "We can also come out and help landowners determine if what they are seeing is cogongrass or not." For more information and to fill out the program application, visit the Cogongrass Control Program. If you suspect you have cogongrass on your property, call your local MFC forester to come do a site visit.

Colorado Department of Agriculture.

In 1997, the Colorado Legislature established the Colorado Noxious Weed Management Fund to provide additional financial resources for on-the-ground noxious weed management. Organized private interests, conservation districts, municipalities, and counties have been eligible to apply for assistance provided that awarded funds are used to enhance weed management efforts within the State of Colorado.

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. Freshwater Fisheries Section.

Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.